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Chronopolis

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  1. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from PhleBuster in Last visual novel   
    G-senjou no Maou I like to hate on this VN because it's a little bit plot holed, but it is a strong mix of thriller and emotion, the main route is quite the ride, and something about the ending.
    It was nice reading your comments on your VNDB list. I mostly play untranslated games, so it's hard for me to pick... you've played many of the quality, intriguing games with a translation.
    Since you've read quite a few experimental works, perhaps SeaBed? It is a sort of unique work, is a lot about the mundane living and coming to terms with the past. It seems to be have been cherished by many who have read it.
  2. Thanks
    Chronopolis reacted to nekofuwafuwa in A VN That Gives Me A Hug   
    Ciel nosurge has a english patch for modded Vita users or/and playlist on youtube with all the story and a lot of interactions translated.
    Ion is a really sweet and lonely girl who interacts directly with the player via the Ps Vita. She is super cute and warm, growing closer with you the more time you spend with her.
     
    And... Um... I really need to play more games with cute girls just being lovely with the player as I am out of other recommendations like these.
  3. Haha
    Chronopolis reacted to Mr Poltroon in Fuwanovel Confessions   
    Do not worry, it is perfectly natural to not realise it when you die.
  4. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Clephas in Alternatives to VNDB   
     
    Erogamescape suffers from the results of being directly exposed to the much larger (currently and past, though who knows about the future?) VN market that is Japan.  To be blunt, you get people down-voting stuff for kicks, company-owned or hired bots in the hundreds voting others up, and no real effort on the part of the site administrators to rein it in.  The troll voting is worse on vndb, to be honest... percentage-wise, there are a significant number of fake players who vote games down or up without even playing them, based on the fact that their votes predate the games' releases (shouldn't it be relatively easy to fix that?  oh well).  That said, the real issue with Erogamescape is that you can't trust the ratings on anything that is hyped (in other words, by one of the big names before they went down) by a relatively 'big name' company... or anything mainstream, really, if you aren't a huge charage fan. 
    In other words, Erogamescape requires too much filtering and preexisting knowledge from the viewer/reader/observer to even get what the real ratings of a given game are...  whereas vndb is a bit simpler.  Anything translated, cut off 90% of the ten, 9, and 1-3 ratings (since people either way overrate or way underrate depending on their prejudices and experience), then recalculate the average.  The rest, subtract all votes prior to two days after the initial release. 
    That's if you are paying attention to voting scores.
    VNDB is relatively simple to figure out... just find the tags you have an interest in, then set the list so the highest rated ones (usually translated) come up first, and browse.  The primary virtue of the site is the huge amount of basic info it holds on most of the VNs released since VNs came into existence.  Also, another way to figure things out is to find a member of Fuwa who shares your tastes, take a look at his vndb profile, then figure out what you want to play from that. 
    The issue with vndb for the whipper-snappers (AKA, 'you young people') is that it is a PC-specialized site.  It is meant to be navigated via PC browsers with a keyboard and mouse, not finger-swipes and tapping, so it is extremely unwieldy when done from smaller tablets and smartphones.  VNDB's secondary utility lies in the fact that most Japanese games have the Japanese-language (kanji and kana) available to copy to a search engine in order to discover walkthroughs, websites that sell the games by download, and other stuff.  Searching a game by the romanized name is generally a dead end for that kind of thing, and remembering the precise kanji for the whole title can often be annoying, so that is seriously convenient, at least for me.
    Honestly, if you can't navigate vndb, I dunno what to tell you... of all the otaku database sites I've navigated over the years, it is the easiest, at least for me.  Myanimelist is a pain in the rear to navigate, as are most of the other anime database sites.  VNDB is a breeze in comparison, since it doesn't present you with a dozen similar titles or barely related titles even if you put the exact one in the search box...
    What is lacking on vndb is decent summaries/intros of most games, since most are poorly-translated translations of the Getchu or official pages, lol. 
    Edit: oops forgot to answer your question in my urge to rave, no, it isn't illegal, since most games have pics on their official sites.  What is illegal is ripping the cgs and posting them online for profit...
  5. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from adamstan in [Video Series] JP VN Guided Reading   
    Hi fellas, Chronopolis here. I want to rollout to you guys this new videos series I'm testing: The VN Guided Tour Project.   The idea is that I'll do a read-through of VN prologues, reading aloud the unvoiced text, and explaining the vocab and grammar.   Reading VN's is very difficult when you first start out. One of the challenges, is that there are a lot of expressions and grammar patterns (out-of-my-ass number, like 33%-40%) which aren't covered by JLPT, but which show up commonly in novels. You can find a lot of grammar guides on the web, so I want to offer something which is dead focused on reading Visual Novels.
    This series is for people who have down some reading in Japanese, but who still maybe struggle on tackling different titles. If you've haven't or have just started reading VN's in Japanese, it might be difficult to follow, but you could try anyways. I explain almost all of it. So far, I've recorded two videos.       Thoughts on this format, anyone? I'd especially like to hear your feedback if you are someone who might use this series.   Edit: Started adding some grammar notes for the lessons. Edit 2: Link to the full folder. I'm going to add some longer guides for JP grammars that need full explanations. Not going to cover everything, just a few select topics. So far there is just one super-guide on conditionals.  
     
  6. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to alpacaman in What other content would you want to see from the visual novel community as a whole? (Not just more translations)   
    I'd love to see some more in-depth critique and analysis of VNs in general, be it about themes in certain titles, storytelling techniques, common tropes and genres, and so on. 
  7. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from adamstan in [Video Series] JP VN Guided Reading   
    Hi fellas, Chronopolis here. I want to rollout to you guys this new videos series I'm testing: The VN Guided Tour Project.   The idea is that I'll do a read-through of VN prologues, reading aloud the unvoiced text, and explaining the vocab and grammar.   Reading VN's is very difficult when you first start out. One of the challenges, is that there are a lot of expressions and grammar patterns (out-of-my-ass number, like 33%-40%) which aren't covered by JLPT, but which show up commonly in novels. You can find a lot of grammar guides on the web, so I want to offer something which is dead focused on reading Visual Novels.
    This series is for people who have down some reading in Japanese, but who still maybe struggle on tackling different titles. If you've haven't or have just started reading VN's in Japanese, it might be difficult to follow, but you could try anyways. I explain almost all of it. So far, I've recorded two videos.       Thoughts on this format, anyone? I'd especially like to hear your feedback if you are someone who might use this series.   Edit: Started adding some grammar notes for the lessons. Edit 2: Link to the full folder. I'm going to add some longer guides for JP grammars that need full explanations. Not going to cover everything, just a few select topics. So far there is just one super-guide on conditionals.  
     
  8. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from adamstan in [Video Series] JP VN Guided Reading   
    Hi fellas, Chronopolis here. I want to rollout to you guys this new videos series I'm testing: The VN Guided Tour Project.   The idea is that I'll do a read-through of VN prologues, reading aloud the unvoiced text, and explaining the vocab and grammar.   Reading VN's is very difficult when you first start out. One of the challenges, is that there are a lot of expressions and grammar patterns (out-of-my-ass number, like 33%-40%) which aren't covered by JLPT, but which show up commonly in novels. You can find a lot of grammar guides on the web, so I want to offer something which is dead focused on reading Visual Novels.
    This series is for people who have down some reading in Japanese, but who still maybe struggle on tackling different titles. If you've haven't or have just started reading VN's in Japanese, it might be difficult to follow, but you could try anyways. I explain almost all of it. So far, I've recorded two videos.       Thoughts on this format, anyone? I'd especially like to hear your feedback if you are someone who might use this series.   Edit: Started adding some grammar notes for the lessons. Edit 2: Link to the full folder. I'm going to add some longer guides for JP grammars that need full explanations. Not going to cover everything, just a few select topics. So far there is just one super-guide on conditionals.  
     
  9. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from MIUUZICK in Eroge with a dominant heroine?   
    https://vndb.org/v10680/
    Luna from Tsuki ni Yorisou Otome no Sahou comes to mind. Isn't translated though.
    She's also dominant in the H-scene if you pick the right choices.
  10. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from adamstan in [Video Series] JP VN Guided Reading   
    Hi fellas, Chronopolis here. I want to rollout to you guys this new videos series I'm testing: The VN Guided Tour Project.   The idea is that I'll do a read-through of VN prologues, reading aloud the unvoiced text, and explaining the vocab and grammar.   Reading VN's is very difficult when you first start out. One of the challenges, is that there are a lot of expressions and grammar patterns (out-of-my-ass number, like 33%-40%) which aren't covered by JLPT, but which show up commonly in novels. You can find a lot of grammar guides on the web, so I want to offer something which is dead focused on reading Visual Novels.
    This series is for people who have down some reading in Japanese, but who still maybe struggle on tackling different titles. If you've haven't or have just started reading VN's in Japanese, it might be difficult to follow, but you could try anyways. I explain almost all of it. So far, I've recorded two videos.       Thoughts on this format, anyone? I'd especially like to hear your feedback if you are someone who might use this series.   Edit: Started adding some grammar notes for the lessons. Edit 2: Link to the full folder. I'm going to add some longer guides for JP grammars that need full explanations. Not going to cover everything, just a few select topics. So far there is just one super-guide on conditionals.  
     
  11. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from Silvz in pick one for me   
    Daitoshokan no Hitsujikai cause Pooltron keeps spamming screenshots from it, and it looks hilarious.
    But Katawa Shoujo is a good read. It's on the shorter side and the routes are varied and pretty interesting.
  12. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from adamstan in [Video Series] JP VN Guided Reading   
    Hi fellas, Chronopolis here. I want to rollout to you guys this new videos series I'm testing: The VN Guided Tour Project.   The idea is that I'll do a read-through of VN prologues, reading aloud the unvoiced text, and explaining the vocab and grammar.   Reading VN's is very difficult when you first start out. One of the challenges, is that there are a lot of expressions and grammar patterns (out-of-my-ass number, like 33%-40%) which aren't covered by JLPT, but which show up commonly in novels. You can find a lot of grammar guides on the web, so I want to offer something which is dead focused on reading Visual Novels.
    This series is for people who have down some reading in Japanese, but who still maybe struggle on tackling different titles. If you've haven't or have just started reading VN's in Japanese, it might be difficult to follow, but you could try anyways. I explain almost all of it. So far, I've recorded two videos.       Thoughts on this format, anyone? I'd especially like to hear your feedback if you are someone who might use this series.   Edit: Started adding some grammar notes for the lessons. Edit 2: Link to the full folder. I'm going to add some longer guides for JP grammars that need full explanations. Not going to cover everything, just a few select topics. So far there is just one super-guide on conditionals.  
     
  13. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from AustriaVNFan in Have you ever read a VN twice?   
    No, I've never reread a VN fully. I just revisit my favourite parts.
    A lot of the description in a VN that helps immerse you in your first play, becomes extra baggage when you go to play the VN again. If the VN is pretty concise in this aspect then you can still play it again. Another way is by waiting many years before replaying the VN. After 4 years, I noticed my impression changes quite a bit (Current impression is different from how I pictured from memories.)
    Basically, I think you reread stuff to check details, or if the work is layered enough so that your impressions will differ and justify a second playthrough.
     
  14. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Clephas in VN from the perspective of gender rebellion   
    I've made this observation before, but Otomege, for all that they profess to be directed at a female audience, are in fact simply directed at a different male audience.  Almost all otomege protagonists are passive, helpless, or have some form of DIDS (Damsel In Distress Syndrome).  There are (a very few) otomege that manage to escape this to one extent or another (my favorite being Sanzen Sekai Yuugi), but those are even more of an exception than the charage where the protagonist has a real personality.  I don't like to be a bastard about this, but the reason I end up only finishing one path or not finishing most otomege is not because I don't like female protagonists... but because the female protagonists are all beta personalities who are just short of being airheads (and some of them are airheads too).  Alpha personality (dominant) female protagonists are about 1 in 50, in my experience, in otomege, to the point where I'm starting to think the industry is trying to brainwash female otakus outright (except more female otakus play BL than otomege in Japan).
    Now, the tendency to find it difficult to forgive promiscuity in females is, in fact, the very reason why most charage have 'all virgin heroines' tags.  This is partly a leftover of pre-modern  society that seems to linger in most cultures across the world that profess equality of the genders, but it is also hard-wired into the male brain.  Games where the heroine is a rape victim are easier to find than ones where the heroine is 'experienced', has an affair, or goes back and forth between the protagonist and other men (if you exclude nukige).  In fact, the percentage of that type of game is vanishingly small, to the point that I can only think of about twenty-five games off the top of my head.  Most of those were horror, had dark elements, or had some kind of brainwashing element involved, so you can see how strong the aversion to NTR in non-nukige is. 
    To explain some of the cultural background... Japan, despite it's 'modernized' culture, is in fact still a culture only a century and a half away from an age where wealthy and/or powerful males were actually more or less expected to keep multiple partners (in the case of the Shoguns, multiple wives outright, most of them chosen for political reasons), all of whom were considered legitimate under the law as long as he had the means to support them and their children.  Even now, most don't think much of it when a wealthy businessman has a mistress or two, as long as there is agreement or approval from the wife (it is the act of hiding another sexual partner that is considered to be dirty, as opposed to  having one).  Oh, if he flaunts the fact that he has multiple partners, it might become an issue (seen as a sign of a lack of proper modesty/humility), but most of the time it doesn't. 
    However, if the female, on the other hand, was with another male, it was pretty much standard to see them beheaded, hanged, or otherwise killed out of hand, along with the man in question.  Modern Japan's taboos are a product of the active encouragement of Western influences after the Meiji Restoration and after WWII, as well as the fact that a huge portion of the privileged castes vanished outright after the Restoration (thus vastly decreasing the number of males that were considered 'entitled' to multiple partners) and the newer castes were eliminated completely after WWII.
    The fact is that Japan is not as progressive in this matter as the urban West even now (the rural West still being generally chauvinistic for various reasons, with exceptions).  Women's choices are questioned if they don't marry by age 25, and there is still a cultural assumption that females will retire early to have children.   While aggressive female personalities are accepted there (outside of non-management work, where aggression is generally discouraged in both genders), aggressive female choices aren't. 
  15. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from Dreamysyu in VN from the perspective of gender rebellion   
    This is because it's difficult to write a good, active MC. Just look at english fanfiction, and you can see the opposite but similiar problem. Tons of active, edgy, but poorly characterized protagonists.
     
  16. Thanks
    Chronopolis reacted to Plk_Lesiak in Are japanese dubs really good?   
    Sorry for nitpicking, because there's obvious merit to your thought and it's true that I was mostly triggered by the absolute nature of Fred's statement. But I feel this is both strawmaning and an unfortunate comparison. Acting, both dubbing and live action, is a way more universal and intuitive craft than translation. Saying a layperson is not qualified to judge it to a reasonable degree, even through cultural barriers is like saying you can't judge a dish unless you're a trained chef, even if you ate 1000 different variants of it. Obviously, the more you know on the topic, the bigger the chance your opinion will be insightful and well-informed, but I don't think the OP asked for an academic dissertation on pronouncing "desu". There are general trends and differences between Japanese and English VA scenes that are much easier to grasp and pinpoint, and I think many people on this site has the experience with the medium and general knowledge to have an informed opinion on the matter. I'll respect the opinion of an expert more and he can give input that will be beyond average person's grasp, but I don't really see the reason to pretend these things are black magic that only the chosen ones are worthy of commenting on.
    I don't really have a dog in this fight, as I don't have any strong opinions on the matter, apart from obvious observations on the scale and prestige of the seiyuu scene. But as a semi-active scholar it makes my blood boil a bit when this kind of elitist BS shows up, pre-emptively discouraging people from joining a legitimate conversation.
  17. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from Kenshin_sama in Are japanese dubs really good?   
    I think overall the voice acting level is significantly higher on average in JP subs, however there are some great english performances.
    Growing up used to watching a language's dub certainly makes it easier to watch. If you listen to something enough, you just recognize it as "that", without judging it. And that familiarity is a positive reaction, usually. When we complain that EN cutesy voices sound bad, there is some level of bias. Since we're used to JP cutesy voices, and we hear English people talk all the time, but Japanese people not so much.
    My usual gripe is that their delivery isn't expressive enough and they don't have the breadth to emphasize all these different situations. Besides those, I guess the most common culprit for a bad dub is a bad script. A good English performance really needs a good English script -- not the accuracy of the TL so much, but whether those lines can be naturally acted out in the scene. Unnatural English sounds REALLY bad.
    Lastly, the Japanese have mastered the art of doing KAWAII voices. There are so many variations, and they still manage to come across clear even when talking fast or using shrill tones. The japanese language might actually help here -- there are so many ways to customize a character's speaking patterns (old-fashioned, personal quirks, etc.). It probably can be done in English too, but that level of adaptation/script-writing is rare, I imagine. There is also little need to make someone sound peculiar, when simply doing a good VA will serve the purpose.
    Curious what people think about a dub like Sunako from Shiki.
     
  18. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from Kenshin_sama in Are japanese dubs really good?   
    I think overall the voice acting level is significantly higher on average in JP subs, however there are some great english performances.
    Growing up used to watching a language's dub certainly makes it easier to watch. If you listen to something enough, you just recognize it as "that", without judging it. And that familiarity is a positive reaction, usually. When we complain that EN cutesy voices sound bad, there is some level of bias. Since we're used to JP cutesy voices, and we hear English people talk all the time, but Japanese people not so much.
    My usual gripe is that their delivery isn't expressive enough and they don't have the breadth to emphasize all these different situations. Besides those, I guess the most common culprit for a bad dub is a bad script. A good English performance really needs a good English script -- not the accuracy of the TL so much, but whether those lines can be naturally acted out in the scene. Unnatural English sounds REALLY bad.
    Lastly, the Japanese have mastered the art of doing KAWAII voices. There are so many variations, and they still manage to come across clear even when talking fast or using shrill tones. The japanese language might actually help here -- there are so many ways to customize a character's speaking patterns (old-fashioned, personal quirks, etc.). It probably can be done in English too, but that level of adaptation/script-writing is rare, I imagine. There is also little need to make someone sound peculiar, when simply doing a good VA will serve the purpose.
    Curious what people think about a dub like Sunako from Shiki.
     
  19. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from nekofuwafuwa in Clephas's Intro into Untranslated VNs by Genre   
    Soft utsuge is a vn which is full of sad feelings: loss, grieving, or regret. There is comfort, but unlike in a nakige, the negative events and resulting strife are a primary part of the story.
    Hard utsuge is when the circumstances throughout the VN (not just the ending) are crushing and it seems like there is no hope.
    At least thats how I distingush them.
  20. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from vizualfan in Is playing VN without Walkthrough (virtually) risky ?   
    Reading the choices can be a moderate spoiler, and it also gives away the structure of the VN. I prefer to pick the choices myself, until I get stuck at all.
    If it's a super clusterf**k of choices I'll end up breaking out the walkthrough pretty soon, no loss there.
  21. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Plk_Lesiak in Do You Prefer Happy Endings Or Bittersweet/More Realistic Endings?   
    True, but I think when people talk about realistic endings, they mean less this kind of statistical similarity to real world and more basic plausibility of the scenario within the game's own setting and rules. I recently had this experience with Heart of the Woods, as I think the bittersweet "bad" endings were more in line with what the game established up to that point than the positive "true ending" was. The game should, above all, respect its own story and characters - make them meaningful and consistent, rather than sacrificing everything for the sake of player's wish fulfilment. You don't need to include every shitty aspect of humanity and our everyday lives for characters to act like actual people would and the scenarios to be relatable. You just need to care about what you're writing about.
  22. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to lunaterra in Do You Prefer Happy Endings Or Bittersweet/More Realistic Endings?   
    I don't like the idea that happy endings are necessarily unrealistic. Like, yeah, bad stuff happens IRL...but so does good stuff.
    If the writers pull a deus ex machina or something equally trite, then I can understand it--those are definitely unsatisfying, and since they often break the laws of that work's universe, those types of endings often contain weird/horrific implications for everyone else in the setting.
    But in general, I find well-done happy endings to be the most satisfying. Not everything has to be absolutely perfect, but there has to at least be hope for the future.
  23. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Clephas in Clephas's Intro into Untranslated VNs by Genre   
    I previously did a simple 'starter list' of relatively easy to read VNs.  However, they were all over the place, and the likelihood of anyone finding a VN that was spot-on in that list was unlikely.  As such, I decided to make a list of five recommendations from each genre for someone who is just starting to play untranslated VNs but isn't up to reading the hardest language out there.  Keep in mind that chuunige and plotge in general have - at the very least - slightly inflated difficulty levels as a result of the writers' tendencies and the fact that narrative/literary Japanese is fundamentally different to those accustomed to dialogue-only mediums like anime or manga.  I'm excluding gameplay hybrids because the sheer amount of crap you have to read without a text hooker in those means beginners won't be able to handle them for the most part without some kind of interface patch or guide.
    Chuunige
    Bloody Rondo (note that I don't recommend this because it is awesome - it isn't - but because it is heavy on slice-of-life for a chuunige and relatively dialogue-heavy)
    Sora no Tsukurikata
    Unjou no Fairy Tale
    Ryuukishi Bloody Saga (if you want to, you can play the dark rapegame prequel... but I don't recommend it for the faint of heart)
    Draculius
    Nakige (note that I'm not including anything Purple Soft and Saga Planets because their games are heavy on wordplay that even an experienced reader will sometimes miss out on)
    Haru to Yuki
    Koi Suru Doll to Omoi no Kiseki
    Moshimo Ashita ga Harenaraba
    Soshite Hatsukoi ga Imouto ni Naru (for true beginners, I recommend this or Haru to Yuki for lower difficulty levels from this part of the list)
        Sci-fi Plotge
    Komorebi no Nostalgica
    Re:Birth Colony Lost Azurite
    Fake Azure Arcology
    Fantasy Plotge (some action but not action-focused or chuuni)
    Ou no Mimi ni wa Todokanai
    Curio Dealer
    Hyakka Ryouran Elixir (yep, these are all AXL games... simply because no one else does this anymore)
    Tiny Dungeon series (this is harem, so if you don't like harem, you probably won't like this)
    Moege/Charage (Yuzu Soft aren't included because their reading difficulty is often too high for beginners)
    Haruru Minamo ni (Straight fantasy ero charage with just enough plot to keep it from being mundane/boring)
    Love Revenge (If you want to know what my idea of a 'decent charage' is based off of, play this)
    Natsuiro Recipe (for those who want their heart healed in a rural Japanese setting)
    Kanojo to Ore no Lovely Day
    Miscellaneous Plotge
    Yomegami: My Sweet Goddess!
    Satsukoi
    Tsuisou no Augment
    Utsuge
    Inochi no Spare ('soft' utsuge)
    Konata yori Kanata made (a 'soft' utsuge probably the only true kamige on this list)
    Houkago no Futekikakusha ('hard' utsuge)
    Kanojo wa Tenshi de Imouto de  (yes, despite appearances, this is a soft utsuge)
     
  24. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from Alcorin in Feeling Uneasy near human   
    I agree with what Plk_Lesiak said.
    Popular and corporate culture says a lot about what should be glamorous, what success/happiness should look like. None of is grounded in objective reality, and shouldn't be taken to heart. If people insist, it might be good to just keep a diplomatic face, acknowledge what they are trying to do, and assert that you have right to believe in whatever the heck you want, without being berated.
     
  25. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from Alcorin in Feeling Uneasy near human   
    I agree with what Plk_Lesiak said.
    Popular and corporate culture says a lot about what should be glamorous, what success/happiness should look like. None of is grounded in objective reality, and shouldn't be taken to heart. If people insist, it might be good to just keep a diplomatic face, acknowledge what they are trying to do, and assert that you have right to believe in whatever the heck you want, without being berated.
     
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