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Chronopolis

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  1. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from Kenshin_sama in The spirit of an older gamer: Why I play games and why other people play games   
    With over 1000+ hours in SC1, 2000+ hours in SC2, and 500+ hours in osu, I think I know the flavours of addiction. I played Starcraft 1 and Starcraft 2 all the time for about a year and two years respectively, quitting mostly just before I went into Uni. Also was addicted to osu in streaks. Now I'm more sensitive to whether or not I'm actually enjoying the game, and I can put in perspective the gratification I'm getting from it.
    Also, about MMorpg's, when I came back and tried MMOrpg's I was suprised at how weak the player to player interaction is by default. Couldn't stand it.
    Glad you realized that. From someone who's gone through this... don't be too hard on yourself if it takes time to get off the game. It's still an activity that you are very used to. Especially for people who have used games as a diversion from real world tasks, important to recognize that failing in real world stuff (like trying to do X, and failing) isn't the end of the world, nor something to be afraid of, you just have to learn from it and try again. RL stuff relies on strategy and skill, and takes time to figure out, just like games.
  2. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Kenshin_sama in The spirit of an older gamer: Why I play games and why other people play games   
    That has given me a lot to think about.
    Ever since I started playing WoW, I've very much developed the kind of addiction you described. Granted, I actually did enjoy the WotLK expansion, but I only played Cataclysm for the PvE rankings. It didn't help at all that I was at the top of performance charts and meters in my guild, other guilds, and sometimes even worldwide (that's when the real obsession begins). Since then, I've put myself through misery in games like Runescape and Osu for the sole purpose of gaining ranks and feeding my ego. Granted, I did enjoy doing quests in Runescape, but I've finished them all and I'm kinda dreading the thought of putting hundreds of hours into grinding xp for ranks. Osu is pretty fun to play on certain beatmaps, but it's a ton of work to get decent at it and it's easy to fall into bad habits that can kill the game for you. I've also put a lot more strain on my tapping hand than I should have. I loved playing Osu at first, but it's been a couple years now and it feels more like I'm in it for the fame than for the fun.
    The one thing about playing games like these is that they make me feel like I'm actually good at something. I was raised in a low-income family, and because my parents were always away at work and I had too many responsibilities taking care of my siblings, doing chores, and never having a regular allowance to spend, I never had the chance to pick up a more productive hobby. A small handful of video games and basic cable were all I had for the longest time. As much as I loved playing enjoyable games that weren't competitive, I still felt like I was lacking something. With online games, I loved the idea of being acknowledged for my skills as a gamer because it gave me a certain sense of pride. Considering how average I am in everything else, this was refreshing in a way. Sadly, however, there are too many downsides to this. The biggest one is that even if I do feel accomplished, I'm still not happy. I get a brief moment of satisfaction whenever someone acknowledges my prowess, but it doesn't last long. Having to put time into something I don't like has made it more difficult for me to cope with depression. I can also get pretty anxious when I'm coming close to a major achievement that I could mess up on. Things like keeping my hardcore status (not dying) on Runescape during a tough boss fight or holding out for a full combo on Osu are pretty nerve-wracking. And because it takes up so much time, I have difficulty putting in the time I need to get my life together (losing weight, finding a job, preparing for college, etc), and that just drives me even further into depression. Pulling myself out of online games would free up a lot of my time, which I could spend doing things I actually enjoy.
    Thanks for posting this. Reading your article and typing about my experience helped me realize how much of a hole I've dug myself into with online games. I don't know if it'll last long (it probably will), but right now I'm convinced that I shouldn't be playing these anymore.
  3. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from Darbury in Gone Home is a visual novel. Deal with it.   
    The definition for I and I believe vndb goes by is: "if significant parts of the story are presented with advancing text (which you virtually always click to advance), it's a visual novel or visual novel hybrid".
    You could easily call that a narrative-centric game, or a game story, or something.
  4. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Decay in Gone Home is a visual novel. Deal with it.   
    I don't see any use in stretching the definition of visual novel. What good does that do anyone? It's okay for these games to be something other than VNs. It's okay to like things that aren't VNs, you don't have to transform everything you like into a VN. I just don't get why people want to do that so badly. 
  5. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Arcadeotic in My ramblings about stuff.   
    Good tips, although most of them are pretty obvious, but always telling them again is never bad and can only be good for you.
    Sexual innuendos and such come pretty naturally when you're translating a nukige (or an utsuge), and I've actually learned to write decent sex talk with my time with Bishoujo Mangekyou. Oh dear, all those terms. They'll probably haunt me to my grave.
    Anyways, good job, till next time
    Good riddance
  6. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Deep Blue in Amane Switch   
    well yandere heroines are not my thing but...utsuge, psychological problems and voiced =must play xD
  7. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Deep Blue in Random VNs: Poll   
    I suggest this one https://vndb.org/v1001 it's dark, sad and written by setoguchi.
  8. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Clephas in Nukige: Grimo Love and some comments on the beginning of Jeanne   
    @starlessn1ght
    The thing is, I really and seriously don't want to play everything from March... just because I have time doesn't mean that it is worth me using that time to do so.  I have other games to play, books to read, and work to do.  I might very well play them as random VNs during the summer, when I probably won't have anything better to do, but it is hard to get up the interest to play a lot of the VNs on March's list.  I don't want to read Maitetsu because Monobeno was my limit (actually over it) for lolige and Maitetsu is even worse.  I don't really want to read the new Dies Irae right now (and maybe not ever) because I honestly don't have a desire to revisit the Dies Irae world without a whole new cast of characters.  Jeanne is giving me headaches from trying to ignore how much I dislike what they are doing in the game.  My reasons for not wanting to play Shoujo-tachi were made pretty clear in the previous one, but I'll add another... I'm seriously bored with seishun drama now, and combined with my increasing distrust of anything by Takahiro that isn't Majikoi, I find it hard to get up the motivation to play it. 
    Giga's newest 'Kiss' series game is just out of the question.
    I might very well dig into Astronauts new dungeon-crawler... if I can decide whether I think it will suck or not. 
  9. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Clephas in VN of the Year 2015: A statement in Compromises   
    Strictly speaking, I really didn't want to name a VN of the Year at all this year... Kikan Bakumatsu barely made it to the level of the lowest of the candidates from last year, and nothing else even managed that, so I picked it, lol.
  10. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Darklord Rooke in Weaboos and Otakus: Top Eight most Annoying Questions (Clephas version)   
    Broadswords being made to 'smash or cut' is as incorrect as the myths about the katana. Actually, most broadswords were light compared to katanas (unless they were ceremonial). They were double bladed, compared to katanas which had a wedge (obviously heavy), and so two handed longswords were longer and weighed about the same as a 2 handed katana (speaking in generalities.) 
    Broadswords were made to cut and thrust. There's a whole bunch of European one handed swords named 'cut and thrust' swords, for a specific reason. Armour was heavy, and people wouldn't wear it unless it was effective. There were a few ways to bypass full bodied armour 1 - thrust at the joints. This is why a lot of European swords have a nice taper compared to Japanese swords. There's even some swords made only for thrusting, including a massive 2 handed one. 2 - Bash and crush bones underneath the armour. You don't do these with swords. You do these with maces, or halberds, or blunt weapons. Pole arms. 3 - Take them to the ground and finish them off there, polearms sorta combined reason number 2 with reason number 3.
    Hollywood likes to have people walking around with 'heavy' 2 handed swords, bludgeoning people. This didn't happen  I prefer European cut and thrust swords mainly because of the versatility, but katanas are obviously far superior in cutting flesh.
  11. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from Zalor in Sayonara wo Oshiete: A VN That Mastered The Use of Atmopshere   
    I love it when the visuals or audio style of the VN complement it or define it's own unique identity (doesn't have to be a unique style). From my experience as well, VN's that utilize the audio and visual aspects draw me in a lot quicker than normal novels. This is even if the base story or depiction is comparable.
    As I found out from Subahibi, Dempa's not really my thing, but maybe I'll come back to this VN. Even though I kinda know what is happening in the VN, somehow getting a hint as how to interpret the (what would normally be) madness makes the VN a more agreeable read. I quite like the observations you made: they're clear and relevant, interesting, and not presuming.
  12. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Ayana in Sakura no Uta part 2: Rin and some linguistic comments (edit: added Rina and yuri ending)   
    I have only been reading early into Sakura no Uta so far and I'm already finding more enjoyment in it than I found in Subarashiki Hibi (I might even..). I'm sure you already know this, but Subahibi was the first considerably complete story (at least, thematically) Sca-ji wrote mostly by himself. As with but not because of that circumstance, he currently seems like more of an overtly earnest storyteller than a seasoned or great one. My bias towards Sca-ji lies at the principles he outlined in the latter most part of Subahibi and the philosophical idea he (attempted to) frame using the wonky narrative composition. Both traits of the story I put personal value into because they're certain reminders of something related to my situation and position (and because Subahibi was my sixth eroge xD) yada yada. But that bias doesn't make me love the game, it makes me love the creator as a person. At this point I'm all-accepting of his methods because I'd rather just converse with him, if through any possible medium. Although, I have no idea as to why other people like Subahibi...
    I feel this has to be said because I do want to look at things from a more "objective" standpoint and move on after making these distinctions. That way I can then say valuable things about his works and him as a person. Seeing your opinion honestly helps me with that.
  13. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from Bolverk in Ask sanahtlig: Answers to Common Issues and Concerns in the VN community   
    I recall reading that 2200 hour label before I started learning Japanese. The time doesn't really says it. The more important part is how the activity studying Japanese is like, and whether or not you can adapt to it.  It's not that difficult. It's not like high level math, where if you don't develop serious intuition and analysis skills you'll never become competent. It's just a ton of work, and there are pitfalls for new learners who miss finding a reasonably effective method of studying. Throughout the process, there are places where you have to make your thinking flexible, and stop comparing Japanese to how English works (that's a whole other beast, and you could spend hundreds of hours becoming a linguist, except that it wouldn't help your Japanese at all.). Although to be fair, studying grammar is about as hard as studying any other course material, and reading native material a bit above your level is mentally exhausting. You can end up mentally spinning your wheels, or misinterpret a topic. Hopefully as time passes you learn where to spend your brainpower and what to just accept as being "some noun/word/thing" or "maybe some grammar I don't know yet".
    To give you a picture, if you some up all my Japanese VN reading and Japanese studying combined is probably about 2700 hours over 3.5 years. Can read unassisted basically all topics which aren't technical (vocab sometimes is a limiting factor). In an easyish light-novel in a familiar setting probably look up about 0.4 words per page , in actual modern literature aimed at adults, about 3-6 words a page.
    If you are used to reading off of TA, reading unassisted (off the VN text instead of the TA window) is just a matter of getting used to it (varying fonts, no word highlighting, no automatic furigana). It's faster to look up words while reading off of TA, which is why most people stay on it for a long time, until they get the common vocab down or start using J-J dics more. Nothing wrong with reading off of the TA window, the vocab lookup speed is great, the only downside is, when it comes to reading unhookable text: not being used to different fonts, and reading only having the kanji. Not that you can still use TA as a faster dictionary while reading off the the VN text.

    I don't want to put an hour count to how long it takes to start reading untranslated novels with a TA dictionary because that sort of gives the wrong impression. People get to that step at different speeds and using different methods. http://forums.fuwanovel.net/blogs/entry/779-japanese-learning-for-vns-skills/ It's not nearly as helpful for me to tell you how long it takes to learn 1000 words, as it is for you to try learning 50 first and see. Of course, everything: grammar and especially vocab/kanji gets easier to learn more the more you learn.
    Oh come on, one man's random entertainment medium is another man's laifu.  How is Japanese going to help me, unless I want to work in Japan or be a translator (not like the pay is any better) . It's all subjective enrichment of one's life.
    I think what he means is that
    1: Don't expect to get far unless you really want it, and have a solid reason. "I'd be cool if I could know Japanese", doesn't cut it.
    2: There's more you can enrich your life with through learning Japanese, besides reading otaku media.


     
  14. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to sanahtlig in Weabooism: The experience, its causes (in Westerners), and tempering it with doses of reality   
    I don't necessarily like Japanese culture.  I like the Japanese *counter* culture as expressed in the otaku subculture.  It's key to distinguish the craziness you see in anime and eroge from what it's actually like to live, study, and work in Japan.  Otaku culture is no more representative of Japanese culture as a whole than Hollywood movies are representative of American culture.
  15. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from sanahtlig in Ask sanahtlig: Answers to Common Issues and Concerns in the VN community   
    I recall reading that 2200 hour label before I started learning Japanese. The time doesn't really says it. The more important part is how the activity studying Japanese is like, and whether or not you can adapt to it.  It's not that difficult. It's not like high level math, where if you don't develop serious intuition and analysis skills you'll never become competent. It's just a ton of work, and there are pitfalls for new learners who miss finding a reasonably effective method of studying. Throughout the process, there are places where you have to make your thinking flexible, and stop comparing Japanese to how English works (that's a whole other beast, and you could spend hundreds of hours becoming a linguist, except that it wouldn't help your Japanese at all.). Although to be fair, studying grammar is about as hard as studying any other course material, and reading native material a bit above your level is mentally exhausting. You can end up mentally spinning your wheels, or misinterpret a topic. Hopefully as time passes you learn where to spend your brainpower and what to just accept as being "some noun/word/thing" or "maybe some grammar I don't know yet".
    To give you a picture, if you some up all my Japanese VN reading and Japanese studying combined is probably about 2700 hours over 3.5 years. Can read unassisted basically all topics which aren't technical (vocab sometimes is a limiting factor). In an easyish light-novel in a familiar setting probably look up about 0.4 words per page , in actual modern literature aimed at adults, about 3-6 words a page.
    If you are used to reading off of TA, reading unassisted (off the VN text instead of the TA window) is just a matter of getting used to it (varying fonts, no word highlighting, no automatic furigana). It's faster to look up words while reading off of TA, which is why most people stay on it for a long time, until they get the common vocab down or start using J-J dics more. Nothing wrong with reading off of the TA window, the vocab lookup speed is great, the only downside is, when it comes to reading unhookable text: not being used to different fonts, and reading only having the kanji. Not that you can still use TA as a faster dictionary while reading off the the VN text.

    I don't want to put an hour count to how long it takes to start reading untranslated novels with a TA dictionary because that sort of gives the wrong impression. People get to that step at different speeds and using different methods. http://forums.fuwanovel.net/blogs/entry/779-japanese-learning-for-vns-skills/ It's not nearly as helpful for me to tell you how long it takes to learn 1000 words, as it is for you to try learning 50 first and see. Of course, everything: grammar and especially vocab/kanji gets easier to learn more the more you learn.
    Oh come on, one man's random entertainment medium is another man's laifu.  How is Japanese going to help me, unless I want to work in Japan or be a translator (not like the pay is any better) . It's all subjective enrichment of one's life.
    I think what he means is that
    1: Don't expect to get far unless you really want it, and have a solid reason. "I'd be cool if I could know Japanese", doesn't cut it.
    2: There's more you can enrich your life with through learning Japanese, besides reading otaku media.


     
  16. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Funnerific in Ask sanahtlig: Answers to Common Issues and Concerns in the VN community   
    Just because you failed doesn't mean others can't do it. I'm reading untranslated stuff quite well after a year of learning.
  17. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Palas in Visual Novels and the Bechdel Test   
    Unfortunately this, a lot like the Bechdel Test, would end up being useless. Especially in the case of a visual novel, as you are considering different stories among a single product. Okabe may have sex with Rukako (oh wow absurd), but only in her route. To intentionally interpolate possible outcomes in a story that doesn't feature them all at once is kind of the wrong way to look at it, depending on the structure a visual novel offers, which, once again, will make us fall into the debate of when you can consider you've finished a VN.
     
    So I'll have to reject your test.
  18. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from Darbury in Eep Opp Ork Ah Ah (Editing Onomatopoeia in VNs)   
    I think it depends whether the goal is to give a similar experience, or give the reader all the information to understand the work. The elegant solution is elegant in that you can appreciate the editor/TL coming up with it, but it might not be inherently better than the footnote. It's just that more often than not you are trying for seamlessness.
  19. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Zakamutt in [Fuwa exclusive][Rant] Promoting VNs in a culture of apathy   
    I think the problem isn't just with marketing, but how you market it. Your post on reddit some time ago illustrates this: first of all, you used a clickbait title, which is frowned upon. Second, you more or less threw three links out there, without much context. A more carefully written post which eased readers into the subject and gave more context to each link would probably have been received somewhat better. The commenters were still a bit too faggoty though, rip.
     
    tl;dr the way you present your content is important
  20. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from Darbury in Preparation H (Getting Ready to Edit VN Sex Scenes)   
    Never have I read such a serious article seriously and laughed so hard. You sir, are a poet and a scholar.
  21. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to astro in Clephas' basic advice to untranslated beginners   
    I just thought I'd add on with a tip of my own. This isn't about reading untranslated Japanese per se, but learning the Japanese required to get to that point:
     
    People who are learning new challenging skills generally have the habit of spending most of their time asking experts for 'secrets' or 'tips' to getting good instead of actually practicing - this includes questions such as "how did you get good at Japanese?" and "what's the fastest way to learn?" This may be because they are unconfident, unsure of themselves, don't know where to start, or just hoping that an easier method will just magically appear (I'm also guilty of this).
     
    First off, there is no 'secret' to learning a language, solely due to the fact that everyone learns differently. Some people learn better with mnemonics, and some people learn better with pure grinding. It's entirely up to you to find what clicks for you. If you're unsure of which route may be optimal for you, then maybe try a bit of everything. Alternatively, you can stick with one thing and switch if you decide that it's not working for you. Learning a skill takes time, and perfecting it takes a lot of trial and error. If you're someone like me and you're always uncertain of where to start, then just do it (cue Shia Labeouf voice). There is no 'bad' starting point as long as you start.
     
    I know that many of you don't have access to Japanese lessons or tutors. While it's true that it's faster to learn something if you have someone to teach you, there is nothing in this world that's impossible to learn on your own if you really put your mind to it - especially with the internet at your fingertips.
     
    With regards to motivation, I know all too well how fast it can drain, even if deep down you're really eager to learn. It's easier at first because you see a lot of progress when you're first starting out, but there will be a time where results will not be as apparent. For me, this was when I first got around to learning kanji. The grammar just flew by and sort of clicked, but I'm the type of person who hates really grindy things (this is also why I hate most RPGs), so it went by really slowly for me. That is when I adapted from grinding to simply reading visual novels (easy ones at first), though admittedly I only grinded for about a week before quitting lol.
     
    Anyway, I suppose that there are some people who are just better at learning languages, but a lot of it is just getting into the right mindset.
  22. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from Darbury in Ojousamas for All! (AKA, The First Reference Rule)   
    That's the same phrasing that gets used sometimes in fantasy novels, explaining items in the world, and the flow is great.
  23. Like
    Chronopolis got a reaction from Darklord Rooke in Ojousamas for All! (AKA, The First Reference Rule)   
    That's the same phrasing that gets used sometimes in fantasy novels, explaining items in the world, and the flow is great.
  24. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to Mr Poltroon in Oh, The Editing Mistakes I Have Made (Part 1 of ∞)   
    I see no reason not to use this as advice for any potential instances I feel inclined to... eh... pretend I'm an editor?
     
    Nevertheless, I can wallow in others' misery and learn simultaneously. How can this not be a wonderful blog post!
     
    "But if you don’t use the Oxford comma, you deserve to die alone."
    I redirect you to this wonderful translation team with which, I'm sure, you have a great deal in common:
    http://theoxfordcommaissuperiorsubs.com/
     
    It is highly recommended you read the acutely enlightening blog posts you will find within, relative to the Oxford Comma's Superiority.
    You will finish an erudite man.
  25. Like
    Chronopolis reacted to havoc in Monster Musume series part 1: Why the heck is Clephas playing this?   
    yeah, dont forget to try out monster girl quest.
     
    I came out of curiosity and stayed for the writing.
     
    as the same thing happend for me for that series.
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