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Zander

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  1. Thanks
    Zander reacted to Zakamutt in The Temple of Nya~   
    にゃに?
     
  2. Thanks
    Zander got a reaction from BackMode in Can someone explain how does one starts a Visual novel localization company?   
    sure thing buddy sure thing 
     
    1. AMASSING CAPITAL - As with the vast majority of businesses, you're going to need some startup capital. Because the general profitability of English language visual novel translations is approximately 0, you will likely have a difficult time finding investors unless they have two or more health conditions that inhibit their brain function. You will most likely have to self-fund. Flip those cushions, ransack your old man's attic for some forgotten stock certificates, you know the deal. The bare minimum, I'd say, is somewhere around $50,000. NOTE that you can increase your (probably non-existent because VN) profit margins by performing a work role in the company, translating, editing, etc; instead of just being the translation sweatshop overseer.
    OK and PLEASE don't go into debt over such a pants-on-head business idea. Please don't. 
    2. ESTABLISH THE COMPANY - Search for how to establish a company in your jurisdiction, it should be the same for a localization business as most other businesses. Come up with some sick name and branding, get a fancy graphic artist to do some of it, maybe get an anime girl mascot since zoomers seem to love that shit these days.
    OK you have money to burn and company branding that hopefully doesn't look like a kindergarten art project, not bad let's get started down that slope that ends in 'we are, regrettably, going to be phasing out of visual novel publishing'.
    3. ACQUIRE LICENSES - This is where my man Kokoro, my 4th favourite person on Fuwanovel, 's advice comes in. Haul ass over to Japan — you DO speak Japanese, right? Perhaps consider enlisting the services of a business consultant with experience in Japan so as to not make a fool of yourself and make use of their connections so you are not cold calling. Otherwise, cold call, flash your sick branding, and attempt to get a meeting with a representative one of the last vestiges of a dying industry. In a pinch, you could try virtual meetings, but in general it is better to have boots on the ground when performing international business. 
    BONUS STEP - Wait for COVID-19 to settle down.
    BONUS BONUS STEP - Consider working with Chinese companies as well so you perhaps stand a chance at financial success. Practise drinking baijiu and sake before you leave in order to sharpen your abilities in shitfaced negotiation.
    4. ACQUIRE STAFF - Assuming you made it this far by the grace of God, you will need staff members to work on the license you have acquired. A translator, an editor, and a QA (preferably a GOOD one they're important) is probably the bare minimum, along with the unfortunate bastard that will have to handle the technical side of things with the engine. Probably attempt to pay them around the sweet spot between 'this would be a decent wage in 1820' and 'this would be a decent wage in 2020'. You have to keep those expenses down but if the sweatshop workers take up arms then the game is all over, commissar.
    5. WORK ON THE THING - Do the translating and the editing and the QA-ing. Try to stick to the deadlines you impose and share, that alone would probably set you apart.
    6. ADVERTISE THE THING AND DO SOCIAL MEDIA THINGS - Again use that sick branding to form an online presence. Do it yourself if you are personable and responsible, otherwise find somebody else to do it. 
    7. SELL THE THING - Contact storefronts, the classics, Steam, JAST USA, all that great stuff we know and love, get it listed places where people can buy it, maybe start your own web store if your web design person lives in an economically depressed region. 
    8. GO BANKRUPT - Ok nah just kidding but probably.
     
    Then you just repeat from 3, possibly skipping 4 if you are a benevolent overlord. Best of luck to you!
  3. Thanks
    Zander got a reaction from Dreamysyu in Can someone explain how does one starts a Visual novel localization company?   
    sure thing buddy sure thing 
     
    1. AMASSING CAPITAL - As with the vast majority of businesses, you're going to need some startup capital. Because the general profitability of English language visual novel translations is approximately 0, you will likely have a difficult time finding investors unless they have two or more health conditions that inhibit their brain function. You will most likely have to self-fund. Flip those cushions, ransack your old man's attic for some forgotten stock certificates, you know the deal. The bare minimum, I'd say, is somewhere around $50,000. NOTE that you can increase your (probably non-existent because VN) profit margins by performing a work role in the company, translating, editing, etc; instead of just being the translation sweatshop overseer.
    OK and PLEASE don't go into debt over such a pants-on-head business idea. Please don't. 
    2. ESTABLISH THE COMPANY - Search for how to establish a company in your jurisdiction, it should be the same for a localization business as most other businesses. Come up with some sick name and branding, get a fancy graphic artist to do some of it, maybe get an anime girl mascot since zoomers seem to love that shit these days.
    OK you have money to burn and company branding that hopefully doesn't look like a kindergarten art project, not bad let's get started down that slope that ends in 'we are, regrettably, going to be phasing out of visual novel publishing'.
    3. ACQUIRE LICENSES - This is where my man Kokoro, my 4th favourite person on Fuwanovel, 's advice comes in. Haul ass over to Japan — you DO speak Japanese, right? Perhaps consider enlisting the services of a business consultant with experience in Japan so as to not make a fool of yourself and make use of their connections so you are not cold calling. Otherwise, cold call, flash your sick branding, and attempt to get a meeting with a representative one of the last vestiges of a dying industry. In a pinch, you could try virtual meetings, but in general it is better to have boots on the ground when performing international business. 
    BONUS STEP - Wait for COVID-19 to settle down.
    BONUS BONUS STEP - Consider working with Chinese companies as well so you perhaps stand a chance at financial success. Practise drinking baijiu and sake before you leave in order to sharpen your abilities in shitfaced negotiation.
    4. ACQUIRE STAFF - Assuming you made it this far by the grace of God, you will need staff members to work on the license you have acquired. A translator, an editor, and a QA (preferably a GOOD one they're important) is probably the bare minimum, along with the unfortunate bastard that will have to handle the technical side of things with the engine. Probably attempt to pay them around the sweet spot between 'this would be a decent wage in 1820' and 'this would be a decent wage in 2020'. You have to keep those expenses down but if the sweatshop workers take up arms then the game is all over, commissar.
    5. WORK ON THE THING - Do the translating and the editing and the QA-ing. Try to stick to the deadlines you impose and share, that alone would probably set you apart.
    6. ADVERTISE THE THING AND DO SOCIAL MEDIA THINGS - Again use that sick branding to form an online presence. Do it yourself if you are personable and responsible, otherwise find somebody else to do it. 
    7. SELL THE THING - Contact storefronts, the classics, Steam, JAST USA, all that great stuff we know and love, get it listed places where people can buy it, maybe start your own web store if your web design person lives in an economically depressed region. 
    8. GO BANKRUPT - Ok nah just kidding but probably.
     
    Then you just repeat from 3, possibly skipping 4 if you are a benevolent overlord. Best of luck to you!
  4. Thanks
    Zander got a reaction from kokoro in Can someone explain how does one starts a Visual novel localization company?   
    sure thing buddy sure thing 
     
    1. AMASSING CAPITAL - As with the vast majority of businesses, you're going to need some startup capital. Because the general profitability of English language visual novel translations is approximately 0, you will likely have a difficult time finding investors unless they have two or more health conditions that inhibit their brain function. You will most likely have to self-fund. Flip those cushions, ransack your old man's attic for some forgotten stock certificates, you know the deal. The bare minimum, I'd say, is somewhere around $50,000. NOTE that you can increase your (probably non-existent because VN) profit margins by performing a work role in the company, translating, editing, etc; instead of just being the translation sweatshop overseer.
    OK and PLEASE don't go into debt over such a pants-on-head business idea. Please don't. 
    2. ESTABLISH THE COMPANY - Search for how to establish a company in your jurisdiction, it should be the same for a localization business as most other businesses. Come up with some sick name and branding, get a fancy graphic artist to do some of it, maybe get an anime girl mascot since zoomers seem to love that shit these days.
    OK you have money to burn and company branding that hopefully doesn't look like a kindergarten art project, not bad let's get started down that slope that ends in 'we are, regrettably, going to be phasing out of visual novel publishing'.
    3. ACQUIRE LICENSES - This is where my man Kokoro, my 4th favourite person on Fuwanovel, 's advice comes in. Haul ass over to Japan — you DO speak Japanese, right? Perhaps consider enlisting the services of a business consultant with experience in Japan so as to not make a fool of yourself and make use of their connections so you are not cold calling. Otherwise, cold call, flash your sick branding, and attempt to get a meeting with a representative one of the last vestiges of a dying industry. In a pinch, you could try virtual meetings, but in general it is better to have boots on the ground when performing international business. 
    BONUS STEP - Wait for COVID-19 to settle down.
    BONUS BONUS STEP - Consider working with Chinese companies as well so you perhaps stand a chance at financial success. Practise drinking baijiu and sake before you leave in order to sharpen your abilities in shitfaced negotiation.
    4. ACQUIRE STAFF - Assuming you made it this far by the grace of God, you will need staff members to work on the license you have acquired. A translator, an editor, and a QA (preferably a GOOD one they're important) is probably the bare minimum, along with the unfortunate bastard that will have to handle the technical side of things with the engine. Probably attempt to pay them around the sweet spot between 'this would be a decent wage in 1820' and 'this would be a decent wage in 2020'. You have to keep those expenses down but if the sweatshop workers take up arms then the game is all over, commissar.
    5. WORK ON THE THING - Do the translating and the editing and the QA-ing. Try to stick to the deadlines you impose and share, that alone would probably set you apart.
    6. ADVERTISE THE THING AND DO SOCIAL MEDIA THINGS - Again use that sick branding to form an online presence. Do it yourself if you are personable and responsible, otherwise find somebody else to do it. 
    7. SELL THE THING - Contact storefronts, the classics, Steam, JAST USA, all that great stuff we know and love, get it listed places where people can buy it, maybe start your own web store if your web design person lives in an economically depressed region. 
    8. GO BANKRUPT - Ok nah just kidding but probably.
     
    Then you just repeat from 3, possibly skipping 4 if you are a benevolent overlord. Best of luck to you!
  5. Thanks
    Zander got a reaction from Infernoplex in Can someone explain how does one starts a Visual novel localization company?   
    sure thing buddy sure thing 
     
    1. AMASSING CAPITAL - As with the vast majority of businesses, you're going to need some startup capital. Because the general profitability of English language visual novel translations is approximately 0, you will likely have a difficult time finding investors unless they have two or more health conditions that inhibit their brain function. You will most likely have to self-fund. Flip those cushions, ransack your old man's attic for some forgotten stock certificates, you know the deal. The bare minimum, I'd say, is somewhere around $50,000. NOTE that you can increase your (probably non-existent because VN) profit margins by performing a work role in the company, translating, editing, etc; instead of just being the translation sweatshop overseer.
    OK and PLEASE don't go into debt over such a pants-on-head business idea. Please don't. 
    2. ESTABLISH THE COMPANY - Search for how to establish a company in your jurisdiction, it should be the same for a localization business as most other businesses. Come up with some sick name and branding, get a fancy graphic artist to do some of it, maybe get an anime girl mascot since zoomers seem to love that shit these days.
    OK you have money to burn and company branding that hopefully doesn't look like a kindergarten art project, not bad let's get started down that slope that ends in 'we are, regrettably, going to be phasing out of visual novel publishing'.
    3. ACQUIRE LICENSES - This is where my man Kokoro, my 4th favourite person on Fuwanovel, 's advice comes in. Haul ass over to Japan — you DO speak Japanese, right? Perhaps consider enlisting the services of a business consultant with experience in Japan so as to not make a fool of yourself and make use of their connections so you are not cold calling. Otherwise, cold call, flash your sick branding, and attempt to get a meeting with a representative one of the last vestiges of a dying industry. In a pinch, you could try virtual meetings, but in general it is better to have boots on the ground when performing international business. 
    BONUS STEP - Wait for COVID-19 to settle down.
    BONUS BONUS STEP - Consider working with Chinese companies as well so you perhaps stand a chance at financial success. Practise drinking baijiu and sake before you leave in order to sharpen your abilities in shitfaced negotiation.
    4. ACQUIRE STAFF - Assuming you made it this far by the grace of God, you will need staff members to work on the license you have acquired. A translator, an editor, and a QA (preferably a GOOD one they're important) is probably the bare minimum, along with the unfortunate bastard that will have to handle the technical side of things with the engine. Probably attempt to pay them around the sweet spot between 'this would be a decent wage in 1820' and 'this would be a decent wage in 2020'. You have to keep those expenses down but if the sweatshop workers take up arms then the game is all over, commissar.
    5. WORK ON THE THING - Do the translating and the editing and the QA-ing. Try to stick to the deadlines you impose and share, that alone would probably set you apart.
    6. ADVERTISE THE THING AND DO SOCIAL MEDIA THINGS - Again use that sick branding to form an online presence. Do it yourself if you are personable and responsible, otherwise find somebody else to do it. 
    7. SELL THE THING - Contact storefronts, the classics, Steam, JAST USA, all that great stuff we know and love, get it listed places where people can buy it, maybe start your own web store if your web design person lives in an economically depressed region. 
    8. GO BANKRUPT - Ok nah just kidding but probably.
     
    Then you just repeat from 3, possibly skipping 4 if you are a benevolent overlord. Best of luck to you!
  6. Thanks
    Zander got a reaction from MaggieROBOT in Can someone explain how does one starts a Visual novel localization company?   
    sure thing buddy sure thing 
     
    1. AMASSING CAPITAL - As with the vast majority of businesses, you're going to need some startup capital. Because the general profitability of English language visual novel translations is approximately 0, you will likely have a difficult time finding investors unless they have two or more health conditions that inhibit their brain function. You will most likely have to self-fund. Flip those cushions, ransack your old man's attic for some forgotten stock certificates, you know the deal. The bare minimum, I'd say, is somewhere around $50,000. NOTE that you can increase your (probably non-existent because VN) profit margins by performing a work role in the company, translating, editing, etc; instead of just being the translation sweatshop overseer.
    OK and PLEASE don't go into debt over such a pants-on-head business idea. Please don't. 
    2. ESTABLISH THE COMPANY - Search for how to establish a company in your jurisdiction, it should be the same for a localization business as most other businesses. Come up with some sick name and branding, get a fancy graphic artist to do some of it, maybe get an anime girl mascot since zoomers seem to love that shit these days.
    OK you have money to burn and company branding that hopefully doesn't look like a kindergarten art project, not bad let's get started down that slope that ends in 'we are, regrettably, going to be phasing out of visual novel publishing'.
    3. ACQUIRE LICENSES - This is where my man Kokoro, my 4th favourite person on Fuwanovel, 's advice comes in. Haul ass over to Japan — you DO speak Japanese, right? Perhaps consider enlisting the services of a business consultant with experience in Japan so as to not make a fool of yourself and make use of their connections so you are not cold calling. Otherwise, cold call, flash your sick branding, and attempt to get a meeting with a representative one of the last vestiges of a dying industry. In a pinch, you could try virtual meetings, but in general it is better to have boots on the ground when performing international business. 
    BONUS STEP - Wait for COVID-19 to settle down.
    BONUS BONUS STEP - Consider working with Chinese companies as well so you perhaps stand a chance at financial success. Practise drinking baijiu and sake before you leave in order to sharpen your abilities in shitfaced negotiation.
    4. ACQUIRE STAFF - Assuming you made it this far by the grace of God, you will need staff members to work on the license you have acquired. A translator, an editor, and a QA (preferably a GOOD one they're important) is probably the bare minimum, along with the unfortunate bastard that will have to handle the technical side of things with the engine. Probably attempt to pay them around the sweet spot between 'this would be a decent wage in 1820' and 'this would be a decent wage in 2020'. You have to keep those expenses down but if the sweatshop workers take up arms then the game is all over, commissar.
    5. WORK ON THE THING - Do the translating and the editing and the QA-ing. Try to stick to the deadlines you impose and share, that alone would probably set you apart.
    6. ADVERTISE THE THING AND DO SOCIAL MEDIA THINGS - Again use that sick branding to form an online presence. Do it yourself if you are personable and responsible, otherwise find somebody else to do it. 
    7. SELL THE THING - Contact storefronts, the classics, Steam, JAST USA, all that great stuff we know and love, get it listed places where people can buy it, maybe start your own web store if your web design person lives in an economically depressed region. 
    8. GO BANKRUPT - Ok nah just kidding but probably.
     
    Then you just repeat from 3, possibly skipping 4 if you are a benevolent overlord. Best of luck to you!
  7. Thanks
    Zander got a reaction from Funnerific in Can someone explain how does one starts a Visual novel localization company?   
    sure thing buddy sure thing 
     
    1. AMASSING CAPITAL - As with the vast majority of businesses, you're going to need some startup capital. Because the general profitability of English language visual novel translations is approximately 0, you will likely have a difficult time finding investors unless they have two or more health conditions that inhibit their brain function. You will most likely have to self-fund. Flip those cushions, ransack your old man's attic for some forgotten stock certificates, you know the deal. The bare minimum, I'd say, is somewhere around $50,000. NOTE that you can increase your (probably non-existent because VN) profit margins by performing a work role in the company, translating, editing, etc; instead of just being the translation sweatshop overseer.
    OK and PLEASE don't go into debt over such a pants-on-head business idea. Please don't. 
    2. ESTABLISH THE COMPANY - Search for how to establish a company in your jurisdiction, it should be the same for a localization business as most other businesses. Come up with some sick name and branding, get a fancy graphic artist to do some of it, maybe get an anime girl mascot since zoomers seem to love that shit these days.
    OK you have money to burn and company branding that hopefully doesn't look like a kindergarten art project, not bad let's get started down that slope that ends in 'we are, regrettably, going to be phasing out of visual novel publishing'.
    3. ACQUIRE LICENSES - This is where my man Kokoro, my 4th favourite person on Fuwanovel, 's advice comes in. Haul ass over to Japan — you DO speak Japanese, right? Perhaps consider enlisting the services of a business consultant with experience in Japan so as to not make a fool of yourself and make use of their connections so you are not cold calling. Otherwise, cold call, flash your sick branding, and attempt to get a meeting with a representative one of the last vestiges of a dying industry. In a pinch, you could try virtual meetings, but in general it is better to have boots on the ground when performing international business. 
    BONUS STEP - Wait for COVID-19 to settle down.
    BONUS BONUS STEP - Consider working with Chinese companies as well so you perhaps stand a chance at financial success. Practise drinking baijiu and sake before you leave in order to sharpen your abilities in shitfaced negotiation.
    4. ACQUIRE STAFF - Assuming you made it this far by the grace of God, you will need staff members to work on the license you have acquired. A translator, an editor, and a QA (preferably a GOOD one they're important) is probably the bare minimum, along with the unfortunate bastard that will have to handle the technical side of things with the engine. Probably attempt to pay them around the sweet spot between 'this would be a decent wage in 1820' and 'this would be a decent wage in 2020'. You have to keep those expenses down but if the sweatshop workers take up arms then the game is all over, commissar.
    5. WORK ON THE THING - Do the translating and the editing and the QA-ing. Try to stick to the deadlines you impose and share, that alone would probably set you apart.
    6. ADVERTISE THE THING AND DO SOCIAL MEDIA THINGS - Again use that sick branding to form an online presence. Do it yourself if you are personable and responsible, otherwise find somebody else to do it. 
    7. SELL THE THING - Contact storefronts, the classics, Steam, JAST USA, all that great stuff we know and love, get it listed places where people can buy it, maybe start your own web store if your web design person lives in an economically depressed region. 
    8. GO BANKRUPT - Ok nah just kidding but probably.
     
    Then you just repeat from 3, possibly skipping 4 if you are a benevolent overlord. Best of luck to you!
  8. Haha
    Zander got a reaction from Chronopolis in Can someone explain how does one starts a Visual novel localization company?   
    sure thing buddy sure thing 
     
    1. AMASSING CAPITAL - As with the vast majority of businesses, you're going to need some startup capital. Because the general profitability of English language visual novel translations is approximately 0, you will likely have a difficult time finding investors unless they have two or more health conditions that inhibit their brain function. You will most likely have to self-fund. Flip those cushions, ransack your old man's attic for some forgotten stock certificates, you know the deal. The bare minimum, I'd say, is somewhere around $50,000. NOTE that you can increase your (probably non-existent because VN) profit margins by performing a work role in the company, translating, editing, etc; instead of just being the translation sweatshop overseer.
    OK and PLEASE don't go into debt over such a pants-on-head business idea. Please don't. 
    2. ESTABLISH THE COMPANY - Search for how to establish a company in your jurisdiction, it should be the same for a localization business as most other businesses. Come up with some sick name and branding, get a fancy graphic artist to do some of it, maybe get an anime girl mascot since zoomers seem to love that shit these days.
    OK you have money to burn and company branding that hopefully doesn't look like a kindergarten art project, not bad let's get started down that slope that ends in 'we are, regrettably, going to be phasing out of visual novel publishing'.
    3. ACQUIRE LICENSES - This is where my man Kokoro, my 4th favourite person on Fuwanovel, 's advice comes in. Haul ass over to Japan — you DO speak Japanese, right? Perhaps consider enlisting the services of a business consultant with experience in Japan so as to not make a fool of yourself and make use of their connections so you are not cold calling. Otherwise, cold call, flash your sick branding, and attempt to get a meeting with a representative one of the last vestiges of a dying industry. In a pinch, you could try virtual meetings, but in general it is better to have boots on the ground when performing international business. 
    BONUS STEP - Wait for COVID-19 to settle down.
    BONUS BONUS STEP - Consider working with Chinese companies as well so you perhaps stand a chance at financial success. Practise drinking baijiu and sake before you leave in order to sharpen your abilities in shitfaced negotiation.
    4. ACQUIRE STAFF - Assuming you made it this far by the grace of God, you will need staff members to work on the license you have acquired. A translator, an editor, and a QA (preferably a GOOD one they're important) is probably the bare minimum, along with the unfortunate bastard that will have to handle the technical side of things with the engine. Probably attempt to pay them around the sweet spot between 'this would be a decent wage in 1820' and 'this would be a decent wage in 2020'. You have to keep those expenses down but if the sweatshop workers take up arms then the game is all over, commissar.
    5. WORK ON THE THING - Do the translating and the editing and the QA-ing. Try to stick to the deadlines you impose and share, that alone would probably set you apart.
    6. ADVERTISE THE THING AND DO SOCIAL MEDIA THINGS - Again use that sick branding to form an online presence. Do it yourself if you are personable and responsible, otherwise find somebody else to do it. 
    7. SELL THE THING - Contact storefronts, the classics, Steam, JAST USA, all that great stuff we know and love, get it listed places where people can buy it, maybe start your own web store if your web design person lives in an economically depressed region. 
    8. GO BANKRUPT - Ok nah just kidding but probably.
     
    Then you just repeat from 3, possibly skipping 4 if you are a benevolent overlord. Best of luck to you!
  9. Haha
    Zander got a reaction from HMfan in Can someone explain how does one starts a Visual novel localization company?   
    sure thing buddy sure thing 
     
    1. AMASSING CAPITAL - As with the vast majority of businesses, you're going to need some startup capital. Because the general profitability of English language visual novel translations is approximately 0, you will likely have a difficult time finding investors unless they have two or more health conditions that inhibit their brain function. You will most likely have to self-fund. Flip those cushions, ransack your old man's attic for some forgotten stock certificates, you know the deal. The bare minimum, I'd say, is somewhere around $50,000. NOTE that you can increase your (probably non-existent because VN) profit margins by performing a work role in the company, translating, editing, etc; instead of just being the translation sweatshop overseer.
    OK and PLEASE don't go into debt over such a pants-on-head business idea. Please don't. 
    2. ESTABLISH THE COMPANY - Search for how to establish a company in your jurisdiction, it should be the same for a localization business as most other businesses. Come up with some sick name and branding, get a fancy graphic artist to do some of it, maybe get an anime girl mascot since zoomers seem to love that shit these days.
    OK you have money to burn and company branding that hopefully doesn't look like a kindergarten art project, not bad let's get started down that slope that ends in 'we are, regrettably, going to be phasing out of visual novel publishing'.
    3. ACQUIRE LICENSES - This is where my man Kokoro, my 4th favourite person on Fuwanovel, 's advice comes in. Haul ass over to Japan — you DO speak Japanese, right? Perhaps consider enlisting the services of a business consultant with experience in Japan so as to not make a fool of yourself and make use of their connections so you are not cold calling. Otherwise, cold call, flash your sick branding, and attempt to get a meeting with a representative one of the last vestiges of a dying industry. In a pinch, you could try virtual meetings, but in general it is better to have boots on the ground when performing international business. 
    BONUS STEP - Wait for COVID-19 to settle down.
    BONUS BONUS STEP - Consider working with Chinese companies as well so you perhaps stand a chance at financial success. Practise drinking baijiu and sake before you leave in order to sharpen your abilities in shitfaced negotiation.
    4. ACQUIRE STAFF - Assuming you made it this far by the grace of God, you will need staff members to work on the license you have acquired. A translator, an editor, and a QA (preferably a GOOD one they're important) is probably the bare minimum, along with the unfortunate bastard that will have to handle the technical side of things with the engine. Probably attempt to pay them around the sweet spot between 'this would be a decent wage in 1820' and 'this would be a decent wage in 2020'. You have to keep those expenses down but if the sweatshop workers take up arms then the game is all over, commissar.
    5. WORK ON THE THING - Do the translating and the editing and the QA-ing. Try to stick to the deadlines you impose and share, that alone would probably set you apart.
    6. ADVERTISE THE THING AND DO SOCIAL MEDIA THINGS - Again use that sick branding to form an online presence. Do it yourself if you are personable and responsible, otherwise find somebody else to do it. 
    7. SELL THE THING - Contact storefronts, the classics, Steam, JAST USA, all that great stuff we know and love, get it listed places where people can buy it, maybe start your own web store if your web design person lives in an economically depressed region. 
    8. GO BANKRUPT - Ok nah just kidding but probably.
     
    Then you just repeat from 3, possibly skipping 4 if you are a benevolent overlord. Best of luck to you!
  10. Like
    Zander got a reaction from Silvz in Can someone explain how does one starts a Visual novel localization company?   
    sure thing buddy sure thing 
     
    1. AMASSING CAPITAL - As with the vast majority of businesses, you're going to need some startup capital. Because the general profitability of English language visual novel translations is approximately 0, you will likely have a difficult time finding investors unless they have two or more health conditions that inhibit their brain function. You will most likely have to self-fund. Flip those cushions, ransack your old man's attic for some forgotten stock certificates, you know the deal. The bare minimum, I'd say, is somewhere around $50,000. NOTE that you can increase your (probably non-existent because VN) profit margins by performing a work role in the company, translating, editing, etc; instead of just being the translation sweatshop overseer.
    OK and PLEASE don't go into debt over such a pants-on-head business idea. Please don't. 
    2. ESTABLISH THE COMPANY - Search for how to establish a company in your jurisdiction, it should be the same for a localization business as most other businesses. Come up with some sick name and branding, get a fancy graphic artist to do some of it, maybe get an anime girl mascot since zoomers seem to love that shit these days.
    OK you have money to burn and company branding that hopefully doesn't look like a kindergarten art project, not bad let's get started down that slope that ends in 'we are, regrettably, going to be phasing out of visual novel publishing'.
    3. ACQUIRE LICENSES - This is where my man Kokoro, my 4th favourite person on Fuwanovel, 's advice comes in. Haul ass over to Japan — you DO speak Japanese, right? Perhaps consider enlisting the services of a business consultant with experience in Japan so as to not make a fool of yourself and make use of their connections so you are not cold calling. Otherwise, cold call, flash your sick branding, and attempt to get a meeting with a representative one of the last vestiges of a dying industry. In a pinch, you could try virtual meetings, but in general it is better to have boots on the ground when performing international business. 
    BONUS STEP - Wait for COVID-19 to settle down.
    BONUS BONUS STEP - Consider working with Chinese companies as well so you perhaps stand a chance at financial success. Practise drinking baijiu and sake before you leave in order to sharpen your abilities in shitfaced negotiation.
    4. ACQUIRE STAFF - Assuming you made it this far by the grace of God, you will need staff members to work on the license you have acquired. A translator, an editor, and a QA (preferably a GOOD one they're important) is probably the bare minimum, along with the unfortunate bastard that will have to handle the technical side of things with the engine. Probably attempt to pay them around the sweet spot between 'this would be a decent wage in 1820' and 'this would be a decent wage in 2020'. You have to keep those expenses down but if the sweatshop workers take up arms then the game is all over, commissar.
    5. WORK ON THE THING - Do the translating and the editing and the QA-ing. Try to stick to the deadlines you impose and share, that alone would probably set you apart.
    6. ADVERTISE THE THING AND DO SOCIAL MEDIA THINGS - Again use that sick branding to form an online presence. Do it yourself if you are personable and responsible, otherwise find somebody else to do it. 
    7. SELL THE THING - Contact storefronts, the classics, Steam, JAST USA, all that great stuff we know and love, get it listed places where people can buy it, maybe start your own web store if your web design person lives in an economically depressed region. 
    8. GO BANKRUPT - Ok nah just kidding but probably.
     
    Then you just repeat from 3, possibly skipping 4 if you are a benevolent overlord. Best of luck to you!
  11. Like
    Zander reacted to Ruberick in Greetings from germany   
    Hi, had an on again off again relationship with VNs for quite a few years, but recently the stranglehold has gotten stronger again.
    I have been frequenting recommendations and walkthroughs for a while from the shadows but thought sometimes I cant help but wanting to join in some of the discussions. Reading pretty much any genre with some hundred VNs allready read.
    Hoping to have a good time with you discussing those, new ones coming out and hidden gems I have not yet read.
  12. Thanks
    Zander reacted to Toranth in The Version of OniiKiss released tuesday was bugged   
    Except that you said you specific words kept in place, rather than having the correct meaning presented.  That's the opposite of an accurate translation.  Whatever you think you understand about what a Japanese character is saying, you're almost certainly wrong... or you are fluent in Japanese and should read the VN in that language.
    Incidentally, there ARE speech styles in Japanese that match up to those used by 'rednecks and chavs'.  Are you saying that you would consider it an inaccurate translation to use those styles in English?
  13. Like
    Zander reacted to Clephas in What i should know when making a translation group?   
    @Asonn I do agree it is difficult for someone other than the main translator to be a leader... but not every translator has leadership or organization skills.  Hell, I know for a fact that I  make a horrible project leader, because I don't have the patience to multitask when that multitasking requires me to be social, lol.
    The main reason that we translators end up as the leaders is because a lot of us are on an ego trip that results in control freak obsessions.  To be blunt, most translators aren't good writers, which is why all those stages (editor, proofreader, translation-checker) are needed to clean things up. 
    Ideally, you should find the most realistic and down to earth person in the group that has social skills and actually cares about the project to run things.  When a translator feels he has to run things from beginning to end, it almost inevitably results in poor atmosphere, fights over little things, the project slowing then stalling, and eventually disbandment.  There are probably translators who can keep an even keel and don't go on ego trips when running a group... but so far, I haven't met any, including myself.  That's why I don't run any sort of translation project anymore. 
    Edit: In the end, this is just my opinion.  In any field, there are talented individuals who can do everything with a certain level of proficiency.  Generally speaking, the main translator should usually be the one who picks the project (or suggest several projects and lets the group decide as a whole, depending on the situation), because no translator is going to stick around for a project he isn't interested in.  It's too much work.
  14. Thanks
    Zander reacted to Zakamutt in Popular Western visual novels.   
    nice ad links lmao
    though indonesian is a weird pick
  15. Thanks
    Zander reacted to Plk_Lesiak in Blogs, articles, videos about editing (VN and otherwise)?   
    As I proud myself with my poor life choices, I'm flirting with the idea of getting into this wonderful, overcrowded and grossly underpaid niche known as editing and I was wondering whether the wise people around here, such as @Decay or @Fred the Barber could recommend any sources to learn about common tools and skills associated with said craft (preferably free, but reasonably cheap ones, like audiobooks or online courses, are also within my interests). 
    If I ever go for it, I'd probably start with offering my services for free to some small-time EVN devs, to gain some experience (you don't need any unpaid workers in your projects @Zander? ), but it's still not something I'd like to go into blind. I obviously have experience with editing journalistic and academic work, but hardly in truly professional capacity.
    Any and all suggestions will be appreciated.
    PS And, of course, if anyone is willing to share their experiences on what editing work for VNs looks like in practice, it'll also be highly appreciated. 
  16. Thanks
    Zander reacted to kokoro in Daitoshokan no Hitsujikai patch out   
    This image has a mixture of straight-up errors and just poor TL choices that aren't technically wrong but are pretty bad in context. I tried to stick to posting lines that the majority of people would think "That's bad" upon seeing. There were a decent number of lines that I considered bad, but not did not include because I could see some people arguing that it was just a liberal translation or something. So really, this image is me being fairly generous.

    The smoking gun of this image is that this is all in the first 20 minutes of the game. Specifically, I watched two Japanese "lets play" Daitoshokan videos, each 10 minutes long on autoplay. Reading normally, it would take maybe five minutes to get to this point. There's this many errors that early into the game, and it hasn't even started yet. This is the tip of the shit iceberg. Five minutes into a like 30 hours long game. There's 29 errors compiled in this image, 1800 minutes of game divided by 5 is 360 chunks this long, this number of errors times 360 is 10,440 errors. At this rate, the game will have 10,440 errors in total. Nearly every other line has some issue, and every third or so has a straight up TL error. If we're being generous and fiddle with the math such that it takes 10 minutes to get to this point, we can lower it down to about 5,000 errors. But like I said, that's being generous. Ouch. 

    Unfortunately, this is what happens when someone with a weak grasp of Japanese translates something. They have to guess a lot, and they rarely fully understand the point of a conversation, so they make mistakes. Constantly. Daitoshokan is that in a nutshell.
     

    CREDITS: QUOF
  17. Like
    Zander got a reaction from kokoro in Daitoshokan no Hitsujikai patch out   
    how so
  18. Like
    Zander got a reaction from Okarin in Tenkiame here and gone before I noticed   
    It's a genuine machine translation, and illegible. The majority of it reads like utter nonsense, and you're not missing out on anything.
    I'm not sure why it's unavailable, though. It may have something to do with Valve's policies considering it has a clearly underage character, but I'm not sure.
  19. Like
    Zander got a reaction from Silvz in Why do you play Visual Novels?   
    to practice my Chinese reading comprehension
  20. Thanks
    Zander reacted to Stormwolf in Tenkiame here and gone before I noticed   
    If this is the case then good riddance.
  21. Thanks
    Zander got a reaction from Narcosis in Tenkiame here and gone before I noticed   
    It's a genuine machine translation, and illegible. The majority of it reads like utter nonsense, and you're not missing out on anything.
    I'm not sure why it's unavailable, though. It may have something to do with Valve's policies considering it has a clearly underage character, but I'm not sure.
  22. Haha
    Zander got a reaction from onii in I'm Looking for harem hentai animation or visual novel or manga or doujinshi   
    Fuwanovel circa 2022

     
    (try this)
  23. Haha
    Zander got a reaction from phantomJS in I'm Looking for harem hentai animation or visual novel or manga or doujinshi   
    Fuwanovel circa 2022

     
    (try this)
  24. Haha
    Zander got a reaction from Templarseeker in I'm Looking for harem hentai animation or visual novel or manga or doujinshi   
    Fuwanovel circa 2022

     
    (try this)
  25. Like
    Zander got a reaction from Dreamysyu in I'm Looking for harem hentai animation or visual novel or manga or doujinshi   
    Fuwanovel circa 2022

     
    (try this)
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