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tymmur

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  1. Like
    tymmur got a reaction from Kenshin_sama in Learning How To Learn Japanese, Part 1: Obligatory Introduction   
    I once saw a polyglot study guide (polyglot is usually defined as knowing at least 5 languages). Apparently they use many different study techniques, but they all have a few things in common:
    study at least 30 minutes each day. have fun while studying. Make sure it will not feel like a chore you have to do even if you don't want to. don't study more than one language at a time. The part about studying every single day is important because the human brain has a place for foreign languages. You need to trigger it with the language of your choice daily. If you only trigger it occasionally, you won't get it into the mindset of the language in question. It's not the amount of time you spend, it's how you spend it. 30 minutes a day is way more beneficial for remembering what you study than a 5 hour study session every Sunday even if the daily study only sums up to 3.5 hours weekly.
  2. Like
    tymmur reacted to Darbury in What Is Editing? (baby don't hurt me)   
    This begs the obvious question: “So what’s Frediting, huh?”
    Frediting is doing all the above very, very well. For example, a good Freditor would smack you upside the head for misusing “begs the question” like that.
    As Fred’s proofreader du jour, I can attest both to the quality of his prose and the dank awfulness of his puns.
  3. Like
    tymmur reacted to ittaku in Adventures In Textual Analysis   
    It's really weird, as it's almost like another language. Because I'm so used to seeing American spelling as well, I easily switch from one mode to the other. As you're likely not used to seeing regular English spelling, you wouldn't have been fluent in it so I can understand why it would be so hard for you. Yes, quite a few still needed to be corrected after your edits, but I've mostly automated that process with my own programming scripts since the bulk of my editors use American spelling.
    For what it's worth, I was quite pleased that I was able to translate the explanation of the theory of relativity and am sorry it didn't flow to your liking But then, that's why I paid you all those peanuts to improve it.
  4. Like
    tymmur reacted to ittaku in Writing more powerful sentences   
    I'm glad to see your enthusiasm for editing continue after cutting your teeth on my project. Just like translating, you will keep getting better with every editing task you do, and then you'll look back on your earlier works and be disappointed by what you did. In your case, it's clear how much you've been thinking about this based on your further research towards improving your editing and I'm glad to have had you as an editor. The community should welcome any competent volunteer and be even more grateful when they're as thoughtful as you're being about the process.
  5. Like
    tymmur got a reaction from Fred the Barber in Writing more powerful sentences   
    I don't read the same into both sentences. In your version she flips through the book until she casually stops. In the original, she flips though the book and stops suddenly because she spotted something in the book. Sure I might be biased because I know the context of the entire scene, but I view that as a bonus.
    I think this will bring it closer to the meaning in the original line. The key difference here is that the stop comes very suddenly and completely unexpected to everybody, including herself. I agree that suddenly should be considered in each case. In this case it fits well because it's a very sudden event like "suddenly a loud bang could be heard and the lights died". The word suddenly tells that something happened without warning and likely quite unexpected.
     
    Other than that I really like the post. I will also add that I had the luxury of reading the VN when it was translated (the start that is. It's not done yet) and then again after Fred edited it. It was an amazing experience. The contents is more or less the same, but the reading experience and enjoyment have been significantly improved. I expected it to be an improvement, but not to the scale that it turned out to be. In fact when I read it yesterday, I realized that despite being aware that editing is a really good thing, I had still underestimated the importance of it. Reading the edited version compared to the unedited version was like... wow. Just wow. I think that's the most accurate description of my immediate impression.
  6. Like
    tymmur got a reaction from Darbury in Waving goodbye to the wave dash ( 〜 ) in VN translations   
    That question contains the very essence of what editing is about. Not just about 〜, but in general. It goes for everything. Perhaps a bit more precise: "how would this line be written if it was originally written from scratch by a native English speaker and not based on a translation?".
     
    Reading the bullet lines I conclude it's one of those signs/words I don't like. The issue is that the meaning depends on context and sometimes the context doesn't provide the answer. This mean two people can read the same text and they end up not having read the same contents. Text should be clear and strait forward to deliver the meaning. Sure a VN could be intentionally vague to postpone revealing what really goes on until later, but that's not what I'm talking about here. It's about wanting to be clear and then write it in a way where people can read it in multiple ways. Considering that 〜 comes with such an issue, it can only be too slow to get rid of it and replaced with something, which can't be read in multiple ways.
  7. Like
    tymmur got a reaction from Darklord Rooke in Waving goodbye to the wave dash ( 〜 ) in VN translations   
    That question contains the very essence of what editing is about. Not just about 〜, but in general. It goes for everything. Perhaps a bit more precise: "how would this line be written if it was originally written from scratch by a native English speaker and not based on a translation?".
     
    Reading the bullet lines I conclude it's one of those signs/words I don't like. The issue is that the meaning depends on context and sometimes the context doesn't provide the answer. This mean two people can read the same text and they end up not having read the same contents. Text should be clear and strait forward to deliver the meaning. Sure a VN could be intentionally vague to postpone revealing what really goes on until later, but that's not what I'm talking about here. It's about wanting to be clear and then write it in a way where people can read it in multiple ways. Considering that 〜 comes with such an issue, it can only be too slow to get rid of it and replaced with something, which can't be read in multiple ways.
  8. Like
    tymmur reacted to Darbury in Waving goodbye to the wave dash ( 〜 ) in VN translations   
    If we take our idea of what's acceptable in professional English writing from Internet usage, we'll be falling down a deep, deep hole for a very long time. To Rooke's point, that tilde is a linguistic cheat, shorthand for emotion in situations where brevity and typing speed matter more than precision. Think of it as a one-character emoticon. And if we say this particular emoticon cheat is fair game, why not all the other emoticons? Rather than make thoughtful use of language to convey whether a person's dialogue is happy or sad or teasing, we could just stick :-) or :-( or :-P at the end of every other line. So much easier, right?
    I'll be blunt: it makes for lazy writing. And worse yet, it makes for uninteresting writing.
    Besides, you're kind of making my case for me. Your example shows the tilde (which looks a lot like the wave dash, but isn't) being used to indicate casual sarcasm. Then we have the wave dash (which looks a lot like the tilde, but isn't) being used to indicate bubbly joy. Oh, and also sometimes sarcasm. Oh, and also sometimes singing. So when a reader sees something squiggly at the end of a line, how are they supposed to interpret it? Is it uplift or put-down? Or pop hit? You might say the reader should figure it out from context, but in a translated VN, cultural context is an ocean away and linguistic context sits at the end of a long game of TL telephone. It's an iffy proposition at best.
    I'll be blunt again: to leave squiggles at the end of a line is to leave a work partially untranslated. And in this case, the burden gets shifted onto the shoulders of an unprepared reader.
  9. Like
    tymmur reacted to Rose in Everything's Coming Up Roses   
  10. Like
    tymmur reacted to Fred the Barber in Kiss Kiss, Interrobang Bang (?! and !? in VNs)   
    UCS-2 support, which I'm pretty certain has every character a VN would need, has been pretty well baked-in to Windows for an eternity, in software terms; I'd expect that Windows 2000 had everything you'd need to do a VN engine in UCS-2. Most likely, the reason they're sticking to the old multi-byte pages is that nobody wants to update old VN engines, because it's a waste of money and time to try to fix things that aren't broken. And even if/when someone builds a "new engine", they almost certainly pull over a ton of code from a previous one anyway, in all likelihood bringing that multi-byte dependency along with them.
  11. Like
    tymmur got a reaction from Darklord Rooke in Kiss Kiss, Interrobang Bang (?! and !? in VNs)   
    ᵯ  ⋛  ␛ ☃ ☠  ☭ ♋  ꈚ ꊪ
    Unicode is fun. There is more or less everything there, even Fuwa users. Hello @Rooke ♜♖
    ௌ <-- that's one single character
     
    I didn't find the dollarpound sign, but I did find this ₠. It's the original Euro sign. They then changed it to € before they actually printed the money, but nobody came up with the idea not to include to old one in unicode.
     
    Or more on topic, here are 4 characters:
    ⁇   ⁈   ⁉   ‼
    If you claim there are 8 characters on that line, then you better stop drinking now. They are only 4 according to unicode.
  12. Like
    tymmur got a reaction from Darbury in Kiss Kiss, Interrobang Bang (?! and !? in VNs)   
    ᵯ  ⋛  ␛ ☃ ☠  ☭ ♋  ꈚ ꊪ
    Unicode is fun. There is more or less everything there, even Fuwa users. Hello @Rooke ♜♖
    ௌ <-- that's one single character
     
    I didn't find the dollarpound sign, but I did find this ₠. It's the original Euro sign. They then changed it to € before they actually printed the money, but nobody came up with the idea not to include to old one in unicode.
     
    Or more on topic, here are 4 characters:
    ⁇   ⁈   ⁉   ‼
    If you claim there are 8 characters on that line, then you better stop drinking now. They are only 4 according to unicode.
  13. Like
    tymmur got a reaction from Darbury in Kiss Kiss, Interrobang Bang (?! and !? in VNs)   
    I love your blogging about issues I haven't really considered, but are actually quite important. On top of informative, it forces me to stop and think, which is a good thing.
     
    Like with your last entry (about quote marks), I have to point out that most VNs use the character encoding cp932. ‽ isn't included in that one, meaning while we might see it in the wild, it will not be inside VNs, at least not those using Japanese engines. It might appear in engines using utf-8 (those claiming international support). Doesn't look like solving !? or ?! with just a merge to ‽.
  14. Like
    tymmur got a reaction from Rose in Saying sayonara to Japanese quotation marks (「」) in VN translations   
    Just to add fuel to the fire, I will add that "" can be problematic. It's a quote in English and in the dawn of time (computer time, that is), programmers figured it would be a good sign to quote strings. This mean "This is a line" will leave out the "" in the string itself. Writing ""This is a line"" will end the string at the second " and cause an error. The way to write the line in a way the computer would understand would be "\"This is a line\"". However it could also be written "「This is a line」". However this only goes for " and this would also be accepted by the computer "“This is a line”".
    For easier comparison:
    "\"This is a line\"" "「This is a line」" "“This is a line”" Next problem is that most VNs use Japanese locale and as such use the shift-jis encoding (or rather Microsoft's codepage 932, which is virtually identical). This mean that not all characters are available. More specifically whatever is used should be available here Microsoft's cp932 page for 0x81 leading byte. Being aimed at Japanese text, they didn't include “”, but row 60, column 05 to 08 looks useful, or at least as close as one can get to what you asked for.
     
    Leaving technical reasons aside, I do actually like the 「」signs. I think they look decent. I just wish they were available with a character width, which didn't provide so much whitespace around them. However they seem to be made to match a default kanji width to make kanji line up vertical. There is nothing we can do about the width, other than making a custom font.
  15. Like
    tymmur got a reaction from Darbury in Saying sayonara to Japanese quotation marks (「」) in VN translations   
    Just to add fuel to the fire, I will add that "" can be problematic. It's a quote in English and in the dawn of time (computer time, that is), programmers figured it would be a good sign to quote strings. This mean "This is a line" will leave out the "" in the string itself. Writing ""This is a line"" will end the string at the second " and cause an error. The way to write the line in a way the computer would understand would be "\"This is a line\"". However it could also be written "「This is a line」". However this only goes for " and this would also be accepted by the computer "“This is a line”".
    For easier comparison:
    "\"This is a line\"" "「This is a line」" "“This is a line”" Next problem is that most VNs use Japanese locale and as such use the shift-jis encoding (or rather Microsoft's codepage 932, which is virtually identical). This mean that not all characters are available. More specifically whatever is used should be available here Microsoft's cp932 page for 0x81 leading byte. Being aimed at Japanese text, they didn't include “”, but row 60, column 05 to 08 looks useful, or at least as close as one can get to what you asked for.
     
    Leaving technical reasons aside, I do actually like the 「」signs. I think they look decent. I just wish they were available with a character width, which didn't provide so much whitespace around them. However they seem to be made to match a default kanji width to make kanji line up vertical. There is nothing we can do about the width, other than making a custom font.
  16. Like
    tymmur got a reaction from Darklord Rooke in Saying sayonara to Japanese quotation marks (「」) in VN translations   
    Just to add fuel to the fire, I will add that "" can be problematic. It's a quote in English and in the dawn of time (computer time, that is), programmers figured it would be a good sign to quote strings. This mean "This is a line" will leave out the "" in the string itself. Writing ""This is a line"" will end the string at the second " and cause an error. The way to write the line in a way the computer would understand would be "\"This is a line\"". However it could also be written "「This is a line」". However this only goes for " and this would also be accepted by the computer "“This is a line”".
    For easier comparison:
    "\"This is a line\"" "「This is a line」" "“This is a line”" Next problem is that most VNs use Japanese locale and as such use the shift-jis encoding (or rather Microsoft's codepage 932, which is virtually identical). This mean that not all characters are available. More specifically whatever is used should be available here Microsoft's cp932 page for 0x81 leading byte. Being aimed at Japanese text, they didn't include “”, but row 60, column 05 to 08 looks useful, or at least as close as one can get to what you asked for.
     
    Leaving technical reasons aside, I do actually like the 「」signs. I think they look decent. I just wish they were available with a character width, which didn't provide so much whitespace around them. However they seem to be made to match a default kanji width to make kanji line up vertical. There is nothing we can do about the width, other than making a custom font.
  17. Like
    tymmur reacted to Valmore in A Working Definition of the Visual Novel (v1)   
    This is a pretty good narrative between @Darbury and @Palas that I'm reading... on my computer screen... with the on-screen text matching their avatars... THIS ISN'T A BLOG! IT'S A VISUAL NOVEL!!!
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