Jump to content
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
Slate Blackcurrant Watermelon Strawberry Orange Banana Apple Emerald Chocolate Marble
  • entries
    704
  • comments
    1,765
  • views
    375,244

Steam: Silverio Trinity append stories

Sign in to follow this  
Clephas

187 views

A few weeks ago, I picked up the Steam versions of Silverio Vendetta and Silverio Trinity.  My reasons in the latter case were pretty self-explanatory... I wanted to read the append after story that Light so cavalierly and cruelly only included with the all-ages version previously only available on the Vita.  Considering that the after story append serves as a bridge between Trinity and Ragnarok, as well as giving you what amounts to a four to five hour extension to the true route... I can say it was worth paying for, even though I essentially skipped through the entire game to unlock it.

There are two new append stories included.  The aforementioned after-story is one, and the other is Ashley Horizon's origin story.  For those who haven't read the main game, this will contain major spoilers.

Spoiler

Basically, it is a brief summary of Ash's life from the time he met the girls at Rain's/Nagisa's family home as a child to the point where he was turned into Hyperion.  It has a number of details about his interactions with Dainsleif and some poignant details of his sense of loss and broken self-esteem born from his failure to protect his childhood friends.  For those who want a deeper understanding of his life, this story is a decent addition to experience.

The after-story append could have easily become the core of a fandisc for most games.  It is extensive (about four-fifths to two-thirds as long as one of the heroine paths) and is action-packed, as well as being chock-full of content of the sort fanboys like me can't help but scream with glee about.  (More spoilers below)

Spoiler

Getting to see Fuhrer Valzeride once again pulling victory from the jaws of defeat versus a foe with overwhelming power was glorious.  Valzeride as an enemy is terrifying beyond belief, as anyone who played Vendetta can attest to, but there is nothing more reassuring than having him on your side.  His unique self-hating hero psychology, with his inherent inability to give up is just as present as always, and the interactions with a certain future antagonist are pretty telling.  Anyone who has played Ragnarok will instantly recognize the antagonist of the after-story after a few lines.  

I was startled to find that the battle scenes were just as interesting as they were in the main game, and it definitely served as a great addition to the story.

Say what you want about Light, but their tradition of extensive append stories and gaiden stories is one I think more plotge companies should consider imitating.  Too bad they went down with Masada's delusions of glory.

Edit: I should note that there is currently no text hooks for the Steam versions of either game, so if you want to use a text-hooker, you'll have to either create an h-code for yourself or beg someone who already knows how.  I had a huge headache from the usual Light 'I've got to gather all the rare kanji into a single sentence!' when I was done.

If nothing else, it is worth it to see this.

Spoiler

 

 

Sign in to follow this  


4 Comments


Recommended Comments

Quote

I had a huge headache from the usual Light 'I've got to gather all the rare kanji into a single sentence!' when I was done.

Do even native speakers struggle to read stuff like this? Seems like it'd be a major hassle to read.

I don't remember any off the top of my head, but I remember running into a few English novels where I constantly needed to look up words, and I usually hate them, lol.

Share this comment


Link to comment
7 hours ago, Kenshin_sama said:

Do even native speakers struggle to read stuff like this? Seems like it'd be a major hassle to read.

I don't remember any off the top of my head, but I remember running into a few English novels where I constantly needed to look up words, and I usually hate them, lol.

It happens, but you have to understand that people who read these types of games in the first place want to be drawn into a world of complexity and meaning.  I never really had any problem with adding to my vocabulary in English or Japanese, so I usually just eagerly try to devour the meanings of any words I haven't encountered.   

Share this comment


Link to comment
6 minutes ago, Clephas said:

It happens, but you have to understand that people who read these types of games in the first place want to be drawn into a world of complexity and meaning.  I never really had any problem with adding to my vocabulary in English or Japanese, so I usually just eagerly try to devour the meanings of any words I haven't encountered.   

Huh, I see. I haven't encountered a book that drew me in with the use of complex writing as opposed to engaging storytelling. I'm pretty sure I won't get that experience from the English TL of Dies Irae due to its frequent misuse of advanced terminology.

Share this comment


Link to comment
On 10/22/2020 at 3:49 PM, Kenshin_sama said:

Huh, I see. I haven't encountered a book that drew me in with the use of complex writing as opposed to engaging storytelling. I'm pretty sure I won't get that experience from the English TL of Dies Irae due to its frequent misuse of advanced terminology.

I thought about trying to explain the reasons... but they tend to vary from person to person.  Some enjoy it because it makes them feel like they are better/more able than others, others purely like adding new vocabulary and grammar usage to their repertoire, and yet others just enjoy the magic of what can be done with languages if you are creative enough.  To be blunt, I'm more of the last one at this point... early on, it was more a bit of reason one and two though.  Nowadays, I've  just gotten to the point where an interesting set of lines is enough to make me feel happy, which I know sounds weird.

To be blunt, Japanese is a much, much more flexible language than English... at least American English, anyway.  The Japanese language never quite abandoned indirectness, which is seen as dishonest by many English speakers.  It is also one of the prime reasons why it is so difficult to translate Japanese to English and why I can still find new things to learn by replaying games like this over and over.  Americans habitually avoid indirect language outside of trained creative writing and politics, and anyone seen using it is seen as smarmy or dishonest (unless you agree with them, of course, lol).  

Implied subjects, layered meanings, colloquialisms, etc etc... I can always find something new if I look hard enough in games like this.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Guest
Add a comment...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...