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Reflecting on my Otaku Origins

Clephas

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I took my first steps onto the road of the otaku in 1992, when I watched the poorly dubbed (all dubs were godawful back then) Record of Lodoss War Volume 1 OVA VCR tape.  Now, I was already a heavy fantasy addict, having been introduced to the Forgotten Realms and Dragonlance in 1990, and my obsession was at its peak at the time.  When I watched Record of Lodoss War, I saw the typical 'elven maiden with human hero' romance in a new way (incidentally, this is a pretty typical romantic theme in those days, less so nowadays).  I also saw oddities that stood out as odd to me precisely because of the oddly black and white point of view enforced on one by the various D&D universes.  

Of course, I was a chuunibyou brat by that time, already, so it should surprise no one that I got obsessed.  It got ten times worse, however, when I encountered Chrono Trigger as it was played on my cousin's SNES.  Chrono Trigger is still, to this day, one of the single best rpgs ever made.  Looking back, considering all that has been done since then, it is almost TERRIFYING that someone was able to do what was done with Chrono Trigger with the limitations placed by using the SNES system.  The story, the world, and the various layers of time were put together into such a subtly complex experience that, to this day, I've yet to see any other rpg manage it.  Chrono Cross would manage to imitate some elements of this with its parallel world jumping, but Chrono Trigger's jumping around in time gave you impetus to explore how every aspect of the world could change based on how and when you did certain things.  Rumors constantly abounded that there were secret endings (such as the infamous 'vampire Chrono' or 'Save Schala' fake rumors, which some believe led to the way the Chrono Cross storyline was handled), and people - such as me - would play the game repeatedly, using all the meager saves allowed by the cartridge limitations of the time, in hopes that they might trigger those endings or find a way to discover something new.  

In all honesty, Chrono Trigger being the game that got me into jrpgs probably ruined me for life.  It set my standards to a ridiculously high level on a subconscious plane, resulting in me comparing every single jrpg experience since then to it.  Aesthetically, musically, and structurally, it was a true jrpg kamige.  It was also the game that turned jrpgs into my second otaku obsession.

During the SNES-PS2 eras, I literally bought and played EVERY jrpg that came out.  I still own them, in fact.  I played most of the PS1 and SNES era games multiple times.

However, it was also in the PS2 era (often called the 'dawn of the mainstream jrpg') that jrpg quality began to fall off drastically.  The kind of genius and artistic flair using minimal resources you saw in previous eras was lost entirely within a few years of the release of FFX (FFX being a good game that also turned VO from a curiosity to a mainstream 'thing').  Musical direction, a role differing from composition, where someone was assigned to decide the timing of using a musical score and which ones fit which dungeons, which story scenes, disappeared in the middle of the PS2 era, as VO was used to fill the gaps of emotionality.  However, this also meant that the subtlety of previous eras was lost with a swiftness that left me bewildered at the time.  

By the time the PS3 era came around, jrpgs were slowing down, due to what I now call 'flashy kusoge fatigue'.  Oh, a few sub-genres, such as the Atelier series' alchemy obsessed SOL titles and the more action-based titles continued to be prolific, but what were called 'console-style rpgs' started to vanish.  MMO elements were introduced into normal jrpgs, making progression and gameplay less interesting as a result (mostly because it seemed to have been done primarily to draw the WoW crowds into solo rpgs).  Storytelling was dying a surprisingly swift death, as tedious gameplay elements (for loot and level-obsessed completionists) began to devour higher and higher proportions of each game's overall playtime.  

There is a very good reason why people go back and play so-called 'retro' jrpgs so much.  There simply aren't that many more recent jrpgs that have that kind of flair and subtle genius.  I know for a fact that one of the best ways to get people addicted to jrpgs is still just to let them play Chrono Trigger.  

Ironically, it was VNs that saved my soul.  This was back in 2008, four years before I joined Fuwa.  I was introduced to Tsukihime by a fellow anime fansubber, and, for the first time in over three years, I had something interesting enough (story-wise) that I was given a perspective on the nature of my growing irritation and fatigue with jrpgs in general.  At the time, the JVN industry was still as vital and full of genius as the jrpg industry was in the PS1 era.  Tsukihime and a few other major classics put out near the turn of the century had created the potential for a market of story-focused VNs that had allowed more and more creative people to get into the medium.  Masada was releasing his latest version of Dies Irae, and there were literally hundreds of potentially interesting VNs for me to try.

Needless to say, I lost my mind almost as badly as when I first played Chrono Trigger.  I must have blown four grand of my meager savings on VNs within the first year, and I didn't regret a penny of it.  Yes, roughly two-thirds of what I bought was pure crap.  However, the gems I discovered gave me a taste of the potential of the medium in a way that was horribly addictive.  Moreover, after a few years of being starved of any decent new stories, even the worst VNs had something that I could find I liked about them.  

In retrospect, I have an addictive personality.  I get addicted to things easily, especially when they scratch my story bug.  People have said to me, when it came to my jrpg obsession 'if you want a good story, why don't you read a book?', to which I usually gave them a blank stare and said 'I'm already reading good books.  I just want stories in my games too.'  

Interestingly enough, there were a few bursts of true creativity in jrpgs in the years since, like Tales of Berseria and Nier: Automata, but they partially stand out due to the sheer bleakness of the genre landscape.  People praise Octopath Traveler and Dragon Quest XI with intensity, and they practically worship Bravely Default.  However, I have been shocked at how low-quality the presentation of these stories has been.  It's like an entire generation has gotten used to ineptness in presentation to the point where they can be charmed by backhanded efforts at retro-nostalgia.  Octopath has all the grind of the old SaGa Frontier games with none of the charm, the best part of each of the paths being at the beginning.  Dragon Quest XI retains the horribly grindy nature of Dragon Quest games without improving on the formula in any real way.  Moreover, locking so much content into the post-game annoys the hell out of me (I prefer new game +, obviously).  

JVNs have suffered their own decline, which is ironically due to the same demographics that inflated the medium in the first place (the dominance of the moe/charage lovers).  VNs were always destined to be a niche medium, but the over-specialization of the industry has led to an inability to adapt to changing spending habits and demographics.  Even if they wanted to regear for a new generation of consumers, most companies no longer have the access to the necessary talent to do so.

I'm fairly sure that jrpgs suffer from a similar lack.  Yes, there are some excellent composers and graphic designers in the jrpg industry, as well as access to the solid voice-acting industry of Japan and the growing one here in the US.  However, there is a severe lack of writers capable of bringing a story to life, and there is no point in a top-tier OST that has no one to properly coordinate its use.  The very fact that something like Undertale could bury so much of the commercial rpg industry, in the eyes of rpg fans, says everything about how far the industry has fallen.

So what am I getting at?  Not really anything, in truth.  I just needed to blow off some steam.  Thank you for reading.



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At best I could only describe myself as a casual gamer, but I do enjoy jrpgs on occasion. Your criticism of Octopath Traveler mirrors my own in a lot of ways. I think the aesthetic of the game is nice, and I quite like the gameplay, but the story and characters were disappointing. Nier Automata I enjoyed a lot, and its probably the most memorable game I played in the past 2 years. I am curious what your thoughts on the original Nier are, particularly the one with papa Nier (who I find conceptually more interesting than his bishounen predecessor). I never got a chance to play it, and it seems like we are never going to get a port of Nier with papa Nier as the main character. But if you have played it, where does it stand in your list of Jrpgs that have come out in the past ~10 years? 

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4 hours ago, Zalor said:

At best I could only describe myself as a casual gamer, but I do enjoy jrpgs on occasion. Your criticism of Octopath Traveler mirrors my own in a lot of ways. I think the aesthetic of the game is nice, and I quite like the gameplay, but the story and characters were disappointing. Nier Automata I enjoyed a lot, and its probably the most memorable game I played in the past 2 years. I am curious what your thoughts on the original Nier are, particularly the one with papa Nier (who I find conceptually more interesting than his bishounen predecessor). I never got a chance to play it, and it seems like we are never going to get a port of Nier with papa Nier as the main character. But if you have played it, where does it stand in your list of Jrpgs that have come out in the past ~10 years? 

Story-wise, the original Nier is an excellent game.  While the gameplay suffers from the usual issues with camera angles that were endemic to most of the ps2 and ps3 era action-jrpgs, it was more than solid enough for a solo title more focused on plot than gameplay.  

Despite the somewhat iffy nature of English dubs, I found Nier's cast to be superlative.  The titular protagonist, Nier was a man with a very clear-cut motive and a powerful driving personality that was constantly razor-focused on his daughter's well-being and, later, that of his friends and companions.

Kaine, the game's sole heroine, is a foul-mouthed girl possessed by an insane serial-killer Shadow.  Throughout much of the game, her role is to kick characters' butts when they start to brood, but, depending on the ending you get, her role changes drastically.  Like many such characters with dark personalities and foul mouths in jrpgs, she has a heart of gold (though it is really, really hidden outside of specific moments).

Emil, the sole character seen in both Nier games, is a young man in the original game, suffering from blindness and from numerous other issues.  He is the most innocent of the characters, with the possible exception of the oft-missing Yona, serving as a strong contrast to the somewhat antagonistic relationship between Nier, Grimoire Weiss, and Kaine.

 

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In my opinion, Nier's charm lies in its lore. Imagine, everything begins from a single flower. Then, there is the rise of an occult, encroachment of danger to modern mankind and then androids. It's mind-blowing.

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1 hour ago, Fuez said:

In my opinion, Nier's charm lies in its lore. Imagine, everything begins from a single flower. Then, there is the rise of an occult, encroachment of danger to modern mankind and then androids. It's mind-blowing.

lol, don't spoil it for the newbies.  We want to make them buy Drakengard and Drakengard 3, after all.

 

 

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Ah. Don't worry. I think I'm being pretty ambiguous. Because the points that I mentioned are obvious from general plot/synopsis; Dakengard 3, Drakengard 1 & 2,  Nier:Gestalt and Nier Automata respectively.  They still need to indulge in the actual game to get a taste of the meat of the story after all.😏

Edited by Fuez

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Reading this reminds me of my youth. I spent hours watching the original Gundam and wishing for something like this in western media. Great blog man.

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5 hours ago, Jardic47 said:

Reading this reminds me of my youth. I spent hours watching the original Gundam and wishing for something like this in western media. Great blog man.

My first Gundam was Wing... but my first mecha was Voltron.

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