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Out for Jury Duty


Clephas

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Yay, I've been summoned for jury duty... *makes a face*

That said, civil duty is civil duty, so I have to live with it interfering with my life.  The first day of my summons is tomorrow, and I've spent the last four days adjusting my sleep schedule so I don't have to do something drastic like pull an all-nighter just to get there on time. 

Anyway, I got all but one of the VNs I planned to play for the month done, and that last one is being a pain in the rear, so I'd have to wait anyway. 

Right now, for my own amusement, I'm replaying Shukufuku no Kane no Oto wa, Sakurairo no Kaze to Tomo ni, another Studio Ryokucha game... and I'm planning to hit Minamijuujisei Renka after that.  I'm most doing this because this studio is one of only a very few that knows how to do non-annoying, truly adorable tsundere, lol.  I'm trying to recapture why I put up with so many tsundere routes over the years.

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On 2016/12/6 at 3:22 AM, Darklord Rooke said:

Can't you pretend to be incredibly prejudiced to get out of jury-duty?

I've always questioned the validity of a system where the fate of the defendant lies with 12 people who really don't want to be there xD

Lol yeah, it seems like a rather idiotic system.

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5 hours ago, Dergonu said:

Lol yeah, it seems like a rather idiotic system.

It isn't so much idiotic as it is a result of both sides of the case acting for the sake of their constituents.  In the case of the prosecutor, they want jurors more likely to go along with their case.  In the case of the defense, they want jurors more likely to be sympathetic to their client.  In the end, those who walk the center road of opinion are the most likely to remain, since extreme cases on both sides will almost always be excluded if both sides are competent.  The system breaks down occasionally - incompetent defense lawyers, prosecutors deliberately choosing jury members likely to be prejudiced against the defendant - but in most cases, things work out fine. 

Also, considering that they pay you only forty dollars a day for what can sometimes run to nine hour sessions, it makes sense to give jurors an out by acting crazy or prejudiced.

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2 hours ago, Clephas said:

It isn't so much idiotic as it is a result of both sides of the case acting for the sake of their constituents.  In the case of the prosecutor, they want jurors more likely to go along with their case.  In the case of the defense, they want jurors more likely to be sympathetic to their client.  In the end, those who walk the center road of opinion are the most likely to remain, since extreme cases on both sides will almost always be excluded if both sides are competent.  The system breaks down occasionally - incompetent defense lawyers, prosecutors deliberately choosing jury members likely to be prejudiced against the defendant - but in most cases, things work out fine. 

Also, considering that they pay you only forty dollars a day for what can sometimes run to nine hour sessions, it makes sense to give jurors an out by acting crazy or prejudiced.

I suppose it can work. Since we don't have anything of the sort here, I guess the idea just seem so strange from outside. I mean, I would never consider myself qualified to decide the fate of someone in court. That's not something a random otaku like me, who has absolutely no education in law or anything of the sort should be doing at all.

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36 minutes ago, Dergonu said:

I suppose it can work. Since we don't have anything of the sort here, I guess the idea just seem so strange from outside. I mean, I would never consider myself qualified to decide the fate of someone in court. That's not something a random otaku like me, who has absolutely no education in law or anything of the sort should be doing at all.

One of the problems when you leave things to a judge is that you are basically handing your fate over to the prosecutor.  Since he has decided to bring you to trial, that means he has a reasonable chance of convicting you based solely on the facts - even if you didn't do it.  While, in a murder case, a judge is unlikely to convict based solely on circumstantial evidence (unless it is truly damning, such as leaving the victim's house five minutes after they are estimated to have died), a judge is also unlikely to be swayed by arguments of emotional derangement or self-defense in most cases, being well-aware of the most minute elements of the law.  Logically, the only time it actually really makes sense to do a judge trial from the defendant's point of view is if you are confident you can wriggle out of things based on a technicality or the minutiae of the law (usually white-collar crimes).

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